Page 109 of 153 FirstFirst ... 9 59 99 107 108 109 110 111 119 ... LastLast
Results 3,241 to 3,270 of 4585

Thread: Controversial Music Opinions...

  1. #3241
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    4,335
    Mentioned
    244 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rampface View Post
    EMDM was the last Manson album that I gave a shit about. For me, that is his last record (TPE is a step in the right direction but the fucking lyrics... ugh!)
    I'd argue TPE's lyrics are still vastly better than most of Born Villain's and far greater than the majority of THEoL's. There's no "15" or "Unkillable Monster" level lyrics in terms of awfulness, haha. Slave Only Dreams to Be King has some great ones, "Like a winter in Hades, We drooled for the ladies as though all the apples were owned by God" is so classic Manson to my ears. "Lazarus' got no dirt on me," "My dagger and swagger are useless in the face of the mirror." There's a lot of very self-aware lyrics about ego, not living up to your reputation or even your own standards, admittance of past failures, acceptance of mortality and actually facing your limitations. It has plenty of lesser-lyrics like Killing Strangers or The Birds of Hell Awaiting but it's still a step up from shitpiles "Sometimes I dream I'm an exterminating angel travelling executioner from Heaven sent to give you the prettiest death I know." I couldn't imagine a worse line possible, ugh. Just typing it made me vicariously embarrassed.

  2. #3242
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Republic of Texas
    Posts
    6,414
    Mentioned
    450 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rampface View Post
    EMDM was the last Manson album that I gave a shit about. For me, that is his last record (TPE is a step in the right direction but the fucking lyrics... ugh!)
    the last one i gave a shit about was Smells Like Children. Seriously.

    BTW @allegro , if i'm not mistaken, the biggest reason for Kurt's death was a self inflicted gunshot wound.
    Last edited by elevenism; 06-19-2015 at 08:29 PM.

  3. #3243
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    pacific northwest
    Posts
    1,760
    Mentioned
    52 Post(s)
    artpop was a good record.

  4. #3244
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Montreal, QC
    Posts
    2,778
    Mentioned
    95 Post(s)
    Now that's a controversial opinion: my take on it is: where are the songs?
    Every time I put it on, I'm like, OK, this is nice and everything, but why are there no catchy songs here? No hits on that record. No Judas, Alejandro, Paparazzi, etc.
    To me it sounds like it was rush-released, and sank without trace.
    The artwork's nice, though.
    I'll keep trying.

    I am now looking forward to the third Kesha record: Warrior was terrible, no energy at all.

  5. #3245
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    4,311
    Mentioned
    60 Post(s)
    Public Image Limited>The Sex Pistols.

  6. #3246
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,324
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by elevenism View Post
    the last one i gave a shit about was Smells Like Children. Seriously.

    BTW @allegro , if i'm not mistaken, the biggest reason for Kurt's death was a self inflicted gunshot wound.
    In Buzz Osborne's commentary about Montage of Heck he seems to imply Kurt Cobain was not suicidal, is he one of the conspiracy theorists about him being murdered? Seems to me the giant industry Nirvana became suggests a lot of people benefitted massively from his death (not just Courtney love)

  7. #3247
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Belarus
    Posts
    2,954
    Mentioned
    36 Post(s)
    Discovery is the only good Daft Punk album.

  8. #3248
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    6,480
    Mentioned
    387 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by kleiner352 View Post
    "Like a winter in Hades, We drooled for the ladies
    Every time I see a quoted Manson lyric lately it's making some reference to greek myth. When did this "the rape of persephone was performed by the wrong greeks" "what did Zeus say to Narcissus" stuff start being a thing?

  9. #3249
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    4,335
    Mentioned
    244 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Jinsai View Post
    Every time I see a quoted Manson lyric lately it's making some reference to greek myth. When did this "the rape of persephone was performed by the wrong greeks" "what did Zeus say to Narcissus" stuff start being a thing?
    All the way back to Holy Wood he was coming onstage in a Roman centurion outfit and chariot so it's safe to say he's always had some level of interest in that general imagery/culture. It's not a great song but the "We eat our young" from We're From America is obviously a mythological reference; Eat Me, Drink Me's You and Me and the Devil Makes 3 has "I'm just like rolling a stone up a hill in Hades," I'm sure there's other stuff I'm just too lazy to remember or go back and listen to to catch, but definitely since EMDM at least.

  10. #3250
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    4,120
    Mentioned
    262 Post(s)
    I love bring me the horizon so much. Sempiternal is SO GOOD.

  11. #3251
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    on my way to hell
    Posts
    802
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Bill Shatner’s Seeking Major Tom is hands down a treasure.

  12. #3252
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    4,120
    Mentioned
    262 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Channard View Post
    Bill Shatner’s Seeking Major Tom is hands down a treasure.
    Well they do say one mans trash.....lol

  13. #3253
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    pacific northwest
    Posts
    1,760
    Mentioned
    52 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by aggroculture View Post
    Now that's a controversial opinion: my take on it is: where are the songs?
    Every time I put it on, I'm like, OK, this is nice and everything, but why are there no catchy songs here? No hits on that record. No Judas, Alejandro, Paparazzi, etc.
    To me it sounds like it was rush-released, and sank without trace.
    The artwork's nice, though.
    I'll keep trying.

    I am now looking forward to the third Kesha record: Warrior was terrible, no energy at all.
    honestly i think most of the tracks sound like singles. it feels like a natural, if kinda crass, progression from born this way.

    "swine" and "manicure" could have been hits (among others).

    i'm also looking forward to more kesha. haven't loved anything since "we are who we are".
    Last edited by kel; 06-21-2015 at 12:35 AM.

  14. #3254
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Hell, Norway
    Posts
    129
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tony.parente View Post
    I love bring me the horizon so much. Sempiternal is SO GOOD.
    Fucking THIS!!!!!!
    Although I have more of a soft spot for There Is A Hell imho.

  15. #3255
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,687
    Mentioned
    31 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Jinsai View Post
    Every time I see a quoted Manson lyric lately it's making some reference to greek myth. When did this "the rape of persephone was performed by the wrong greeks" "what did Zeus say to Narcissus" stuff start being a thing?
    when he realised nick cave and tom waits are cooler than he is?

    miaaaaowww... probably true though, let's be honest

  16. #3256
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Highland Park, IL
    Posts
    10,751
    Mentioned
    783 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sutekh View Post
    when he realised nick cave and tom waits are cooler than he is?

    miaaaaowww... probably true though, let's be honest
    yup, I was thinking the same thing. He's trying to sound "educated" but Greek myth is pretty banal.

  17. #3257
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,687
    Mentioned
    31 Post(s)
    the manics are the only ones who can get away with gratuitous name dropping

  18. #3258
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    4,311
    Mentioned
    60 Post(s)
    Here's my MM ranking

    Mechanical Animals
    Holy Wood
    Eat Me, Drink Me
    Antichrist Superstar
    The Pale Emperor
    TGAOG
    Born Villain
    The High End of Low
    Portrait of an American Family

  19. #3259
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,687
    Mentioned
    31 Post(s)
    mechanical animals
    antchrist superstar
    live album
    slc
    portrait
    holywood
    eat me drink me
    gaog
    tpe
    theol/bv joint last

    slc and ltoe beating holywood qualifies this post as controversial

  20. #3260
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,324
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Anyone want to take bets on how soon in this Manson \ Pumpkins tour, the BFF relationship breaks down into some kind of feud, particularly if one band gets a better audience reaction?

  21. #3261
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    4,311
    Mentioned
    60 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by WorzelG View Post
    Anyone want to take bets on how soon in this Manson \ Pumpkins tour, the BFF relationship breaks down into some kind of feud, particularly if one band gets a better audience reaction?
    Call me an optimist, but I think this tour will go smoothly. These are guys in their mid-to-late 40s and have been friends for years.

  22. #3262
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    4,311
    Mentioned
    60 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by thevoid99 View Post
    And then he'd tell Kanye to go get his fuckin' shine box and shine his million dollar shoes.
    I know this is old, but I just wanted to point out that Frank was no racist. Listen to what he says about segregation in Vegas.

  23. #3263
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Highland Park, IL
    Posts
    10,751
    Mentioned
    783 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RhettButler View Post
    I know this is old, but I just wanted to point out that Frank was no racist. Listen to what he says about segregation in Vegas.
    No, he absolutely was not racist. See this article from the Chicago Tribune from years ago:

    Race Relations Sinatra's Way
    June 08, 1998|By Laura S. Washington.

    When Frank Sinatra died May 14 at age 82, I got condolence calls from friends and family. Not because I knew him, but because they know I am a huge Sinatra fan. That admission gets me a lot of strange looks. Frank Sinatra? Wrong generation, wrong music, and most of all, wrong race. What kind of self-respecting African-American woman of the '90s is into Sinatra?

    A favorite childhood memory sets the scene: Late into the night, most every night, my parents spun his tunes on the record player (as we called it in pre-high technology times), lulling me into sweet sleep. The grooves on our dozens of Sinatra LPs were well worn. I know ever line of every song by heart.

    But since his death, I have discovered a much better reason to remember Sinatra: A white megastar who promoted civil rights for African-Americans at a time when few whites, and certainly not the prominent and wealthy, even acknowledged we existed. Long before it was politically correct, Sinatra treated blacks with dignity and respect.

    The recent, obligatory recollections of Sinatra's way, his style, his hat choice, his boozing and his women hardly hinted at this side of Sinatra. But I was enlightened by another unlikely Sinatra fan: the Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr., who issued a statement, "There was room for everybody at the chairman's table." I called Jackson for elaboration, and as usual, he was happy to eloquently set me straight.

    "You must appreciate how racially segregated America was 50 years ago," he said. In the 1940s and 1950s, America was in apartheid. And "the courts, legislation, laws, the churches, all institutions converged with the blessing and rationalization to justify it," Jackson said. An institution himself, Sinatra, was uniquely positioned to "knock down ancient walls and build bridges."

    Sinatra's star power opened doors for us, literally and figuratively. In his heyday, he performed with almost every black idol of jazz, blues and swing: Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Nat King Cole, Billy Eckstine, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Lena Horne, Sammy Davis Jr. They all became friends.

    By adapting their music for white audiences, Sinatra gained more fame and money than any black artist could achieve in a segregated society. But he gave credit where it belonged--with the African-Americans who pioneered and perfected the genres. Sinatra often said Holiday was his "greatest single musical influence." Of Ella: "She, in my opinion, is the greatest of all contemporary jazz singers."

    On tour, Sinatra refused to play at clubs unless blacks were permitted to attend. He would not sleep in a hotel that banned his black colleagues. There's a famous story about how he escorted Lena Horne to the Stork Club, a whites-only hot spot, and insisted they admit her. After much hand-wringing, they did.

    In 1946, his documentary on race relations won a special Academy Award. And the July 1958 edition of Ebony Magazine featured an essay by Sinatra on race. "A friend to me has no race, no class and belongs to no minority. My friendships are formed out of affection, mutual respect and a feeling of having something in common. These are eternal values that cannot be classified," he wrote. Jesse Jackson recalls that in the turbulent 1960s, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. recruited Sinatra to join civil rights marches in the South.

    One Sinatra friendship stands out. "No act was more noble than his stand with the late, great Joe Louis, he said. Louis, the world heavyweight champion, defeated white fighter Max Schmeling at a time when Adolph Hitler was touting Schmeling as a symbol of Nazi and Aryan superiority.

    Later in his life, Louis was nearly broke and reduced to working as a greeter in a Las Vegas hotel. As he neared a bitter end, many white Americans had come to view him as an object of disgrace, even pity, Jackson recalled.

    But Sinatra hosted a fundraiser for Louis' charity that raised hundreds of thousands of dollars, arranged for the fighter to have heart surgery and eventually paid for his funeral. Sinatra "sensed what Joe Louis meant to America," Jackson said.

    Sinatra's flaws have been well-documented. Critics note that despite his close friendship with Sammy Davis Jr., he and his fellow "rat packers" would make Davis the butt of crude jokes during their performances.

    Yet for his time and place, Sinatra's contributions to race relations demonstrate that if we are ever to reach a semblance of equity, we'll need the Sinatras to help us get there.

    Sinatra once said: "We've got a hell of a long way to go in this racial situation. As long as most white men think of a Negro first and a man second, we're in trouble. I don't know why we can't grow up."

    Today, at a time when the need for civil rights is being questioned, even dismissed by some, it seems we're still on that road. But as we review the life of Sinatra the song master, let us learn from Sinatra the bridge builder.

  24. #3264
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Milwaukee
    Posts
    3,579
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    I don't think thevoid was ever implying Sinatra was racist...

    Pretty sure most of us know that's a line from Goodfellas. "OG"

  25. #3265
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Highland Park, IL
    Posts
    10,751
    Mentioned
    783 Post(s)
    Sinatra's got guys like him in his stool.

    I just like to post stories about Sinatra, since this is the Sinatra Centennial.

  26. #3266
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    4,311
    Mentioned
    60 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Krazy View Post
    I don't think thevoid was ever implying Sinatra was racist...

    Pretty sure most of us know that's a line from Goodfellas. "OG"
    I haven't seen Goodfellas in ages, must have gone over my head.

  27. #3267
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    5,266
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    I've been thinking about this for awhile, wanted to see how it fairs here. It's sort of half-cooked but bear with me.

    Rock music no longer being as culturally relevant, might wind up being the best thing to have ever happened to it. I'm thinking of that quote from Kanye said about him being the biggest rock star now. Metallica fans can juxtapose it with a picture of Hetfield all they want, but he's right. And again, that may not be a bad thing. In this culture of instant celebrity, and the increasing narrative of style over substance in pop music, maybe rock & roll shouldn't fit in and just thrive on a more obscure level occasionally popping out into the mainstream. It could allow more room for artists to breathe, at the expense of not having to sell out stadiums or share that kind of burning white hot attention nobody truly deserves anyway.

  28. #3268
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    4,311
    Mentioned
    60 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by onthewall2983 View Post
    I've been thinking about this for awhile, wanted to see how it fairs here. It's sort of half-cooked but bear with me.

    Rock music no longer being as culturally relevant, might wind up being the best thing to have ever happened to it. I'm thinking of that quote from Kanye said about him being the biggest rock star now. Metallica fans can juxtapose it with a picture of Hetfield all they want, but he's right. And again, that may not be a bad thing. In this culture of instant celebrity, and the increasing narrative of style over substance in pop music, maybe rock & roll shouldn't fit in and just thrive on a more obscure level occasionally popping out into the mainstream. It could allow more room for artists to breathe, at the expense of not having to sell out stadiums or share that kind of burning white hot attention nobody truly deserves anyway.
    There's been a handful of rock bands from the last few years that I kind of like, but nothing in the same league as The Beatles, Stones, Velvet Underground, Doors, Zeppelin, etc. The 1990's were awesome, and there's not too much I'm interested in after that, as far as new rock bands are concerned.

  29. #3269
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    9,368
    Mentioned
    139 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by onthewall2983 View Post
    I've been thinking about this for awhile, wanted to see how it fairs here. It's sort of half-cooked but bear with me.

    Rock music no longer being as culturally relevant, might wind up being the best thing to have ever happened to it. I'm thinking of that quote from Kanye said about him being the biggest rock star now. Metallica fans can juxtapose it with a picture of Hetfield all they want, but he's right. And again, that may not be a bad thing. In this culture of instant celebrity, and the increasing narrative of style over substance in pop music, maybe rock & roll shouldn't fit in and just thrive on a more obscure level occasionally popping out into the mainstream. It could allow more room for artists to breathe, at the expense of not having to sell out stadiums or share that kind of burning white hot attention nobody truly deserves anyway.

    We're still going to have our Disturbeds, Nickelbacks, Three Days Graces, Five Finger Death Punches, Cage the Elephants, Imagine Dragons and Breaking Benjamins so I wouldn't fully agree. Bad mainstream rock music will always be around.

  30. #3270
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Milwaukee
    Posts
    3,579
    Mentioned
    69 Post(s)
    Rock, rap, hip hop- it's all dead IMHO. They've all seen their better days as a whole. You'll get your exceptions here and there but I think the last renascence was the 90's.

    I I don't envy "new" musicians at all. There's only so many riffs and notes and stuff you can sing or rap about. That's a a tough gig to be good and or original.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions