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Thread: Can NIN still gain amounts of new fans?

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    Can NIN still gain amounts of new fans?

    I wonder if NIN still be able to gain (large) amounts of new (younger?) fans without neglecting the core fan base too much? Can NIN still be trendy? What do you think about?

    In my opinion, at least there was lack of use of Hesitation Marks' marketing potential because there were no real video or singles or an arg like YZ for example. It seems to me that they try mostly to cater to existing fans? Are here people who became a fan during Hesitation Marks?

    What are your general impressions?
    Last edited by Bookmark; 07-31-2016 at 06:33 PM.

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    It would require a major rethink on marketing, and a very fresh, relevant record.

    With Teeth saw the last huge swell in fandom, and that took two videos with a lot of airtime, several big singles, loads of advertising, Dave Grohl drumming, new personnel, new style... and that's before getting into the more subjective stuff like the thematic core, writing style, notation and instrumentation.

    So basically, it'd take a combination of several different aspects working very well. Lots of effort, lots of good thinking, lots of money. It couldn't be done just by boiling most of it down to Trent and friends, we've seen the fruit of that over the last 8 years. Great music (IMO at least), no great swell in fandom that I've noticed.

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    I think his film work is more vital than NIN, personally.

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    Interesting question.

    About what number would you say constitutes large amounts? And what age range would you define as younger?

    It’s hard to judge this kind of stuff by album sales these days. But maybe if nin did a new album supported with touring, then we could get an age graph of attendees to see what demographics nin was pulling in.

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    It's possible. They gained me when I was about 15 (20 now) between Ghosts and Hesitation Marks when there wasn't really anything going on. I sort of just stumbled onto them though. Played Guitar Hero at a party, heard Wish, thought it was something new and exciting (At the time I preferred pop music and lighter alternative stuff) and fell in love with the majority of the NIN catalogue over time.

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    I've somehow always thought so and hoped so, but obviously accepted that it wouldn't be anywhere like the 1990s or 2000s.

    As far as younger fans go, I've certainly still seen more fans born around 1990-1993 show up all over the Internet in the 2010s, along with more fans born after 1995, but they're still in the minority. I could've sworn that I had actually seen a few fans here born in 1998, 1999 and even 2001 a few years ago, but it was such a rare occurrence.

    At this point, I'm now wondering about possible fans that are younger than The Fragile these days, which I at least saw in real life last year when I saw NIN live.
    Last edited by Halo Infinity; 11-10-2019 at 04:48 PM.

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    This might get some face palms... but I listen to the Alternative XM station (whenever I drive my wife's Tahoe, which is about 3 times a week), and it's OK, there's some decent stuff on there sometimes, but I sometimes wonder how some of the songs from the Trilogy would sound on there. I feel like a few songs would actually "fit in", because they occasionally play some more edgy alternative songs, which I tend to like, like for instance they play this song by a band called "Absofacto - Dissolve", which I really enjoy.

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    I think NIN should pull a Thom Yorke and make a short film that accompanies their new album like Yorke did for Anima. It even streamed on Netflix. I think an album that could be expanded over different mediums would definitely help it get attention. Perhaps get Lynch involved or a really good director. Paul Thomas Anderson directed Anima and a bunch of videos for Radiohead. Personally, I would pick David Fincher for the win. The trilogy seemed like it could have been a good moment to do something like this. I think Trent will stick with the shorter album format.

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    Do a tour with David Lynch and steal more of his fans.

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    Quote Originally Posted by d1stinct View Post
    This might get some face palms... but I listen to the Alternative XM station (whenever I drive my wife's Tahoe, which is about 3 times a week), and it's OK, there's some decent stuff on there sometimes, but I sometimes wonder how some of the songs from the Trilogy would sound on there. I feel like a few songs would actually "fit in", because they occasionally play some more edgy alternative songs, which I tend to like, like for instance they play this song by a band called "Absofacto - Dissolve", which I really enjoy.
    Perhaps it could instantly work with the likes of Burning Bright (Field On Fire), Not Anymore and Shit Mirror as a first impression for unsuspecting listeners.

    I sometimes like entertaining such thoughts as well. It's like those songs from the trilogy, at least to me, seem to scream, "Well, I've got your edge right here.", but in a great way.

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    Seems like Rock is having a bit of a valley period in the culture generally right now, but perhaps that is beginning to shift. Maybe the generational divide to too wide to overcome as well?

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    there will be an audience for NIN among the disaffected yoots for a long time, just off of TDS. same theory as goth. although not necessarily goth per se, the cure live on off of disintegration.

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    I have TikTok on my phone (I know, but it's actually kind of addicting) and I've seen a LOT of young kids with NIN shirts and posters on their walls. It's the same "type" of kids that always seemed to really enjoy the music back when I was young - the kids sort of into alternative fashion and music. Stores like H&M and Forever21 have sold NIN shirts before and those things fly off the damn shelves in my mall. When I was seeing a show on the most recent tour I saw a lot of younger fans there too.

    Do I think that Trent will ever have a song on top 40 rotation again (outside of Old Town Road that is)? Probably not, but I don't think it really matters anymore. He's sort of transcended all that. Barring some major PR crisis, NIN is kind of always going to be seen as "cool" now in the same way that Led Zeppelin and Bowie were when I was a kid. They didn't have songs on the top of the charts anymore, but a lot of people in general liked them and were interested in their music.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eachpassingphase View Post
    I have TikTok on my phone (I know, but it's actually kind of addicting) and I've seen a LOT of young kids with NIN shirts and posters on their walls. It's the same "type" of kids that always seemed to really enjoy the music back when I was young - the kids sort of into alternative fashion and music. Stores like H&M and Forever21 have sold NIN shirts before and those things fly off the damn shelves in my mall. When I was seeing a show on the most recent tour I saw a lot of younger fans there too.

    Do I think that Trent will ever have a song on top 40 rotation again (outside of Old Town Road that is)? Probably not, but I don't think it really matters anymore. He's sort of transcended all that. Barring some major PR crisis, NIN is kind of always going to be seen as "cool" now in the same way that Led Zeppelin and Bowie were when I was a kid. They didn't have songs on the top of the charts anymore, but a lot of people in general liked them and were interested in their music.
    Think I've said this on the site before but worth repeating. I think Trent is carrying the torch for Bowie. He'll never allow himself to be pigeon holed anymore. He'll do what he feels is right & not be overly worried about the commercial repercussions. I think Trent is doing ok at least (probably better than ok) money wise. He can definitely continue the touring like last year. Some festivals mixed in with reasonable sized venues. I don't think many tickets were left unsold on Cold Black & Infinite. & the soundtrack work will be a gift that keeps on giving especially since it has been of such high quality. The future is bright!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max View Post
    Seems like Rock is having a bit of a valley period in the culture generally right now, but perhaps that is beginning to shift. Maybe the generational divide to too wide to overcome as well?
    NIN never really fit entirely in the mainstream "rock" mold, anyhow (David Fricke essays notwithstanding). Their chances of being added to the Cleveland Rock Hall of Fame are only slightly higher than nil this year because of the local connection, what with the band's midwestern USA origins. But it's not just Trent Reznor's story anymore, Atticus' membership has put them on a new course with the last three releases. I think their concern for being culturally relevant or at the centre of pop discourse is gone, their lack of desire for attention amidst the astonishing success of "Old Town Road" this year proves that.

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    There are a lot of young beautiful people with beautiful voices performing beautiful songs they've written... and no one cares.

    There are teams of highly paid, intelligent, and creative people who are hired to make sure their clients breakthrough and that people care. I remember 10 years ago or so when I saw a Michael Buble poster on every billboard in my city... he must have spent a fortune for his success.

    Green Day somehow broke all the rules with American Idiot (amazing album) and they gained millions of fans under the age of 10. Then there is Madonna who keeps trying, puts out decent songs, but no one cares about her anymore and the kids aint down with old people, or so says my 10 yr old nephew.

    Trent/Atticus know the formula to create a pop album and get on the charts. It's not difficult. Could they pull off an American Idiot?

    Yes.

    Do they want to?

    Not at this time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by snaapz View Post
    Green Day somehow broke all the rules with American Idiot (amazing album) and they gained millions of fans under the age of 10. Then there is Madonna who keeps trying, puts out decent songs, but no one cares about her anymore and the kids aint down with old people, or so says my 10 yr old nephew.

    Trent/Atticus know the formula to create a pop album and get on the charts. It's not difficult. Could they pull off an American Idiot?

    Yes.

    Do they want to?

    Not at this time.
    I just wanted to say that I've actually pondered about a parallel between Green Day and Nine Inch Nails. (I tend to do that with bands chronologically in spite of their differences.)

    Both debuted in the very early 1990s. Pretty Hate Machine in 1989. (So early, it came out in the tail end of the 1980s.) 39/Smooth in 1990.

    Both performed in Woodstock 1994, with 3 CDs released.

    Dookie and The Downward Spiral

    American Idiot and With Teeth (I kind of saw With Teeth in that way.)

    And yes, I don't doubt that they could either, and also understand why they'd rather not intentionally throw themselves at all directions at all times either, while just taking it day by day.

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