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Thread: The 2000's - What was it?

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    The 2000's - What was it?

    It's easy for anyone to say the 80's music was pretty awesome and the 90's were amazing. It's easy to name favorites and hits from those eras.... the songs that defined the 80's and 90's... 70's and beyond even.

    What the fuck happened in the 2000s?


    Metallica, Hall and Oats, GnR, Thompson Twins, Michael Jackson, Ah Ha, Phil Collins... owned the 80's and we sill love them.

    What comes to mind for the 2000's? What songs from the 2000's will still hit the airwaves in the year 2020+? I'm curious as to what songs come to mind when you think of the 2000's. Were the 2000's dominated by hip hop? Did boy bands and screemo emo take off? What is just a cluster fuck of too many genres bottle necking MTV?
    Last edited by snaapz; 05-23-2014 at 09:14 AM.

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    I LOVE music from the 1980's and 1990's and most of my favorite bands are from those times (and most are still kicking it). However, it is ignorant to to say there are no good bands or musicians from 2000 onwards. I could name tons of bands and artists I listen to that began after the year 2000. You have to find the ones worth listening to and those that are talented.

    The only negative thing I can say about bands from 2000 onwards are, that due to better technology and more willingness to sell out to mediocrity in mainstream for record sales, shittier bands and musicians are more in your face and dominate most airwaves. Shake them off and look for those worthwhile.

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    The 2000's is an era that's only just beginning.

    Assuming you're talking about the "naughts" (the '00s), I'd say it was an era dominated by over-produced Top 40/pop music. Think Britney/Christina, Eminem/Kanye, etc.

    Those are the acts that come to mind. I know most of them first started making it big in the late 90's, but I associate the bulk of their careers and peak stardom as being in the '00s. Who will we be listening to in 2020? Hopefully none of them.

    (Side note: who the hell are the Thompson Twins?)

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    If we are thinking 'big acts' which will stand the test of commercial radio classic channels etc... then look at the top 40 stuff sure... from a more indie perspective.. its going to be the artists who have been big headliners: Arcade Fire, The Shins, Coldplay, Sigur Ros, Vampire Weekend, The Strokes, The Killers..
    But then each genre will have its big acts and game changers, look at how electronica have grown and evolved since 2000, we've had dubstep, grime, stuff like Flying Lotus, garage, minimal, 'folktronica' etc... and ever genre has done the same.. the thing is, that little thing called the internet has allowed these genres and styles the room to become their own, albeit much smaller scenes. Everyone interested in music has their own place and timeline, but for those less engaged in the intricacies of the 'music scene' then yes.. see above.

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    Because of some of the legap events of the nineties ive always thought of the last decade as defined by the increasing divode between corporate and independent music. MTV started doing reality, big radio could suddenly control more stations than ever before, with much more.power and influence over music.

    Obviously this is something that started in the late nineties. And now file sharing was a thing and so what people can and do listen to is far, far more diverse and ambiguous than. An offhand list. File sharing turned genre into a fractile experience, moving much more quickly than people were used to.

    The decade is less about specific bandw and more about two movements that were both pretty huge.

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    I remember very clearly what happened. The delineating factor as I recall was the Spice Girls, and a concerted effort to revitalize "pop" as the top brand, after half a decade of hard rock and gangster rap having unusually successful runs. Around this time, Napster happened, the first real alternative to the marketing channels that are radio stations, MTV, and music stores. This was right around the time college students were getting access to broadband internet. Instead of college radio, which typically served as the alternative channel for promoting 'different' music, there was file sharing. The types of people who listened to commercial radio continued to tune in to commercial radio, but the college radio scene lost any drive it used to have.

    It wasn't until this current decade that I felt like more solid marketing channels were established online for music. The reason you remember certain bands from the 70s, 80s, and 90s is that you saw those bands on tv, heard them on the radio, listened to them in movie soundtracks, saw them on late night television. Keep in mind, if you look at the charts from any of those 'good' decades, there was still horrible pop outselling the quality music you appreciate, in droves.

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    Although it's a movement that died as quickly as it was born, nu-metal is what springs to mind when I think of 00s music. Every decade has its pop, rap and r&b (edit: except those that didn't...), though I do agree with over-production being a particular hallmark of recent music.
    Last edited by Vertigo; 05-23-2014 at 10:26 AM.

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    I read somewhere that nu-metal was basically killed by 9/11 because the majority of it's fanbase enlisted. At first glance that seems like a bad joke, but honestly within that bad joke there must be some truth to it because it did decline after 2001 I think. Coldplay became pretty huge and behind them a swarm of pop-rock bands that were already successful (Matchbox 20/Twenty) or just on the cusp (Train).

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    Theres a bunch of interesting bands/solo acts active since the 2000's, even if i don't like their whole discographies/singles i can tell the cultural impact they are already having (or had) on the mainstream:
    - Jack White
    - Arctic Monkeys
    - Arcade Fire
    - Queens of the Stone Age (i consider them more a 2000's band than a 90's group)
    - Yeah Yeah Yeahs
    - M.I.A.
    - Kanye West
    - Amy Winehouse
    - The Killers
    - The Strokes
    (many more...)

    To me, most of them have the possibility to become "classic radio" in the future...

    ...and also there are "indie" acts that are becoming cult acts quickly:
    - The Knife
    - The Horrors
    - Editors
    - LCD Soundsystem
    - TV on the radio
    - Mastodon
    - Tame Impala
    - The National

    ...As i said: i'm not a fan of all their stuff but i recognize their quality and many of their singles/songs are already a cultural landmark

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    The 2000s seemed like an era where progressive and art rock/metal exploded and allowed bands like Porcupine Tree, The Mars Volta, Opeth and dredg to successfully tour and gain popularity. A lot of your alternative fan base went that direction and just flat out got bored with Nu-Metal and Rapcore, or whatever. At the same time, mainstream became clogged with even more generic pop music as opposed to previous decades and that's where most of the masses settled that simply didn't have an ear for the more artsy heavy stuff. Hip Hop got even more incorporated into that mainstream and 10 years later, that seems to be where we are today....
    Last edited by pulse; 05-23-2014 at 11:43 AM.

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    I consider the late 90s and early 2000s the best period of electronic music. I thought the sound there was the best (today, much of the music is too loud/overproduced for me). Then, around 2002/2003 the "The" bands came (The White Stripes, The Strokes, The Vines). Then I guess the next big thing (2004-2006) were the new indie bands like The Arctic Monkeys and Franz Ferdinand. And then there was dubstep. I guess none of these things will ever have the impact on music that "the classics" have. After all, new music will always have to compete with old music, i.e. there will be divided attention/playtime/marketing. Also, there's a bit of a feeling that everything has already been done before and better. (Will there ever be a bigger boy band than the Beatles? A heavier stage show than Led Zeppelin? A better dancer than Michael Jackson?) And with the internet, there is so much competition. You can listen to the most obscure music out there, you don't "have" to like what everybody likes. Teen culture does not cross over into the mainstream anymore. And the internet is also a competition as a cultural force, as well as TV and gaming. Music does not have the same impact on a person's 'social caste' anymore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theimage13 View Post
    (Side note: who the hell are the Thompson Twins?)
    decent new wave band from the 80s with some great hits:








    there's even an option 30 cover of the latter...

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    Quote Originally Posted by snaapz View Post
    Hall and Oats, Thompson Twins, Phil Collins... owned the 80's and we sill love them.
    ....we do?

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    I can't lie, I love me some Phil Collins and Genesis (though I fully acknowledge how safe and schmaltzy Collins is....) I just...dig their stuff haha.

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    I like this topic, even though I don't have much to add to it. From what it appears to me, even in spite of the hate and criticism they get on ETS, Linkin Park, Slipknot, Staind, and Coldplay seem to be like a "big 4" from the 2000s to me. (I'm also speaking in terms of popularity and trends for the most part. They all really seemed to have consistently dominated the first half of the 2000s.)

    I'm also getting a bit nostalgic for 2000-2004 myself, as those were my years in high school.

    -Edit-

    This also really takes me back to Eminem. He was always big, but damn. 1999-2004 really had him all over the place, especially in 2000-2002.
    Last edited by Halo Infinity; 05-24-2014 at 06:25 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jinsai View Post
    ....we do?
    Phil Collins is fucking awesome. The man is a kick ass drummer and his solo stuff is awesome despite its schmaltzy moments. Plus, how can you not love Hall & Oates?

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    Quote Originally Posted by thevoid99 View Post
    Plus, how can you not love Hall & Oates?
    I'm just not a big fan of blue eyed soul I guess.

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    I like Live At Daryl's House.​ But that's about it.

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    I can't think of a single band that released their debut album in the 2000s that I loved. I also can't think of a single album from a 2000s band that will be seen, in years to come, in the same light as Nevermind, Revolver, Pet Sounds, London Calling, etc.

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    The internet happened. It's easier to find, access and hear about artists. Instead of hearing the same 40 artists on the radio or MTV, the wealth is being spread around a bit. You usually won't see an album that's actually good hit #1 anymore.

    Personally, I like it. I've discovered so much more music, because of the internet, that I would have never had the chance to hear 10,20,30 years ago. I don't really give a shit that there might not be any defining artists or albums of the 2000s.

    That said, I CANNOT stand when people say that there is no good albums or bands in the 2000s or whatever. Sure, there is a lot of shit to sift through, but it's ignorant to believe that nothing good has come out since the 90s.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackholesun View Post
    The internet happened. It's easier to find, access and hear about artists. Instead of hearing the same 40 artists on the radio or MTV, the wealth is being spread around a bit. You usually won't see an album that's actually good hit #1 anymore.

    Personally, I like it. I've discovered so much more music, because of the internet, that I would have never had the chance to hear 10,20,30 years ago. I don't really give a shit that there might not be any defining artists or albums of the 2000s.

    That said, I CANNOT stand when people say that there is no good albums or bands in the 2000s or whatever. Sure, there is a lot of shit to sift through, but it's ignorant to believe that nothing good has come out since the 90s.
    There's some cool stuff that I've heard from newer (2000+ bands). Overall, however, I didn't like the 2000s nearly as much as I liked the 60s-90s and there was not a band from the last 15 years that I would consider to be great. White Stripes, Black Keys, etc, good stuff, just not Soundgarden, Van Halen, Led Zeppelin, Doors, Hendrix good.

    Elephant was no LA Woman.

    Just my opinion of course.
    Last edited by GulDukat; 05-23-2014 at 06:14 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by henryeatscereal View Post
    Theres a bunch of interesting bands/solo acts active since the 2000's, even if i don't like their whole discographies/singles i can tell the cultural impact they are already having (or had) on the mainstream:
    - Jack White
    - Arctic Monkeys
    - Arcade Fire
    - Queens of the Stone Age (i consider them more a 2000's band than a 90's group)
    - Yeah Yeah Yeahs
    - M.I.A.
    - Kanye West
    - Amy Winehouse
    - The Killers
    - The Strokes
    (many more...)

    To me, most of them have the possibility to become "classic radio" in the future...

    ...and also there are "indie" acts that are becoming cult acts quickly:
    - The Knife
    - The Horrors
    - Editors
    - LCD Soundsystem
    - TV on the radio
    - Mastodon
    - Tame Impala
    - The National

    ...As i said: i'm not a fan of all their stuff but i recognize their quality and many of their singles/songs are already a cultural landmark
    I like almost all of these bands. That said, IMHO, they don't touch the greatness of the major titans from the 60s-90s.

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    I usually find myself listening to more of 2000's-2010's music than anything else. Don't get me wrong, I'll never say no to 80's or 70's music; I'm just more compelled by what's currently going on in the music world than revisiting old classics.
    Last edited by wizfan; 05-23-2014 at 07:10 PM.

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    pretty surprised kid a hasn't been mentioned. that was a pretty huge way to start off the decade.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheyCallMeDrug View Post
    pretty surprised kid a hasn't been mentioned. that was a pretty huge way to start off the decade.
    ,

    I see the 1990s-era lasting from 1991 to 2000/2001, much like "the 60s" kind of ended in '71-'72, "the 70s" ended in '81, etc.

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    The 2000s is definitely the most perplexing decade in music history. Lets just say im glad things have changed now because for a few years it hit rock bottom, everything hit a plateau and felt complacent, Nu-Metal to my mind was just an extension or more agressive version of Grunge gone in the wrong direction. I hated the Indie music scene mostly though. That stripped down, 70s influenced spiky guitar sound was the fucking worst, total lack of imagination sterile boring, sexless. Urgh. But i agree with others a huge reason for this was becuase the music industry was in dissaray and going through changes.


    As the decade progressed from about 2007 onwards i noticed things got better again. I think Youtube helped a lot.

    I think music in general has recovered dramatically in the past 5 years. just more experimentation, different sometimes better ways to market challenging music, would say from about 2010-2013 have been the best years in music since the mid 90s.
    Majority of that good music is electronic music.

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    ...got released in the 00's (justifies the decade already...)

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    From 2000-2009 I would consider Christina Aguilera, Beyonce, Brittney Spears, Usher, Spice Girls as some of the larger pop acts. I won't even get into the rock, electronic, rap and hip hop albums because I don't want to write a huge essay here. But, indie music is the biggest of the decade along with pop IMO. White Stripes, The Strokes, Franz Ferdinand, Arcade Fire, Radiohead, Flaming Lips, Modest Mouse, Yeah Yeah Yeahs and many others had influential albums in that decade. The indie music from that era is influencing plenty of artists in this current decade, and in the future, those acts will make those 00's bands classic acts. Recently, I think, the indie sound has become pretty mainstream. Pop music for college kids sort of deal. This over saturation of the indie sound will lead to something new that will explode in the next decade. I think it will be electronic music, seeing as it has only gotten bigger and bigger over the decades.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RhettButler View Post
    I can't think of a single band that released their debut album in the 2000s that I loved. I also can't think of a single album from a 2000s band that will be seen, in years to come, in the same light as Nevermind, Revolver, Pet Sounds, London Calling, etc.
    You're setting the bar really high there, and you're narrowing it down to rock. The 2000s was the turning point where rock music stopped being the unmistakable music superpower.

    Still, with rock bands, there was Tame Impala, The National, Interpol, The White Stripes (and all the Jack White related stuff), Deerhunter, Other Lives, Tune Yards, Spoon, Grizzly Bear, Boris, Sigur Ros, DFA 1979, The Joy Formidable, It Hugs Back, Queens of the Stone Age...

    And while that might not seem immediately on par with stuff that's been certified as classic, there's undeniably some truly eternal songs in there.

    For instance, Seven Nation Army is one of the most instantly recognizable riff rock songs ever, and it's pretty undeniably great. I'm not even the biggest Jack White fan, but if you took all of his best tracks and put them on one album, it would stand against almost anything... which is sort of how I feel about U2.

    Also, we're not talking enough about electronic music and hip hop in here. We've seen entirely new genres spring up since 2000 in the electronic and hip hop worlds, and they're pretty much owning the mainstream (and underground) now.
    It might not be your thing, but a lot of this music is going to be (eventually) recognized on par with the music we currently accept to be classic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jinsai View Post
    You're setting the bar really high there, and you're narrowing it down to rock. The 2000s was the turning point where rock music stopped being the unmistakable music superpower.

    Still, with rock bands, there was Tame Impala, The National, Interpol, The White Stripes (and all the Jack White related stuff), Deerhunter, Other Lives, Tune Yards, Spoon, Grizzly Bear, Boris, Sigur Ros, DFA 1979, The Joy Formidable, It Hugs Back, Queens of the Stone Age...

    And while that might not seem immediately on par with stuff that's been certified as classic, there's undeniably some truly eternal songs in there.

    For instance, Seven Nation Army is one of the most instantly recognizable riff rock songs ever, and it's pretty undeniably great. I'm not even the biggest Jack White fan, but if you took all of his best tracks and put them on one album, it would stand against almost anything... which is sort of how I feel about U2.

    Also, we're not talking enough about electronic music and hip hop in here. We've seen entirely new genres spring up since 2000 in the electronic and hip hop worlds, and they're pretty much owning the mainstream (and underground) now.
    It might not be your thing, but a lot of this music is going to be (eventually) recognized on par with the music we currently accept to be classic.
    You're right--I was speaking of the rock genre. I kind of assumed that was what we were talking about, so that's what I was trying to compare, 60s-90s rock to rock from the last 15 years, apples to apples. But you are right, a broader look, examining different genres can be used.

    And I agree that I set the bar pretty high, but I feel that the bar should be set high. I like a lot of the bands that you mention--I just don't think that any of them released a masterpiece, i.e. Pet Sounds. I agree that "Seven Nation Army" is a cool (albeit overrated) song. But really, what else does Jack White have? In three short years Jimi Hendrix (a true guitar god) released probably a dozen songs that your average rock fan could recognize in 2 seconds--Jack White is very talented, but he's not in the same league as Hendrix, Waters, Dylan, etc.

    Also, not to split hairs, but QOTSA are from the late 90s. Songs For the Deaf, is, IMHO, the best rock album of the last 15 years and a masterpiece. Most of the albums that I loved from the 2000s (Oceania, Year Zero, Wasting Light, etc.) were from bands that were formed prior to 2000.

    Let's look at the last four decades of the 20th Century:

    1960s- Highway 61 Revisited, Pet Sounds, Forever Changes, Revolver, The Doors s/t
    1970s- Exile on Main Street, Led Zeppelin IV, The Dark Side of the Moon, Paranoid, Machine Head
    1980s- Let it Be, Appetite For Destruction, The Queen is Dead, Master of Puppets, The Joshua Tree
    1990s- Nevermind, Superunknown, Dirt, Ten, The Downward Spiral

    Those are just a few examples from each decade, one could name dozens more. Just of the rock genre, can you think of five albums, by bands formed in the 00s, that have released albums as great as anything from the above list? I don't ask this to sound confrontational, but I am genuinely curious what albums, from newer bands, people think will be seen as a true classic.
    Last edited by GulDukat; 05-24-2014 at 07:05 AM.

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