Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Lovecraft Country (HBO Series)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    New York, New York
    Posts
    3,641
    Mentioned
    80 Post(s)

    Lovecraft Country (HBO Series)

    LOVECRAFT COUNTRY



    Based on Matt Ruff's novel of the same name, Lovecraft Country follows Atticus Freeman (Jonathan Majors) as he meets up with his friend Letitia (Jurnee Smollett) and his uncle George (Courtney B. Vance) to embark on a road trip across 1950s Jim Crow America in search of his missing father (Michael Kenneth Williams). This begins a struggle to survive and overcome both the racist terrors of white America and the terrifying monsters that could be ripped from a Lovecraft paperback.

    Lovecraft Country is executive produced by showrunner Misha Green along with J.J. Abrams, Jordan Peele, Bill Carraro, Yann Demange, Daniel Sackheim, and David Knoller.

    PREMIERES SUNDAY, AUGUST 16TH



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    New York, New York
    Posts
    3,641
    Mentioned
    80 Post(s)
    Anyone watch this last night? Thought the premiere episode was pretty good. Where Watchmen delt with race issues under the guise of a superhero story, we now have Lovecraftian monsters tearing people apart. I hope they keep this going throughout the whole stories. What a whacky opening lol.
    Last edited by neorev; 08-17-2020 at 05:53 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    W/A
    Posts
    3,177
    Mentioned
    98 Post(s)
    I've been waiting for this since I first heard it was being made. I read the book back in 2016 and just loved it. I'm sure the show is going to be different but I don't care. It's been four years so it'll be 'new' to me either way.

    I just wish the electronic book covers would keep the original design. This cover is all I knew about the book when I saw it in the library. I'm a big old-gods guy so I was very interested just by the name. It wasn't until I was about halfway through the book that someone - not me - noticed what the tentacles were. Brilliant.

    https://jarrodtaylordesign.com/Lovecraft-Country


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,177
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Liked the first episode, but the racism aspect seemed really overdone to me...maybe that's the intention?

    Looking forward to seeing where it goes from here.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bayonne Leave It Alone
    Posts
    4,339
    Mentioned
    80 Post(s)
    the figures on both the male and female leads, Majors & Smollet, are kinda insane. Perfect humans haha.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois
    Posts
    9,700
    Mentioned
    445 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Kodiak33 View Post
    Liked the first episode, but the racism aspect seemed really overdone to me...maybe that's the intention?

    Looking forward to seeing where it goes from here.
    sorry, i'm not trying to be a dick, but if you think the racism aspect was overdone, you don't know anything about US history. sundown towns were a real thing that existed in all parts of the country for a long, long time.

    the reference uncle george makes to getting his kneecaps shattered in Anna?

    Anna was historically a sundown town, in which African Americans were excluded from living in the town's limits. According to historian James W. Loewen, a common adage in the town was that its name of "Anna" was a backronym standing for "Ain't No Niggers Allowed".[14][15] The phrase is still well-known, with few non-white residents owing in part to its historical reputation.[16]
    that's in fucking illinois.

    so no, it isn't "overdone" in any way. just like the tulsa massacre depicted at the beginning of watchmen, it's a historically accurate depiction of the horrors of humanity committed by those white people who claim themselves "superior" to people of color.

    anyway, i'm absolutely loving the show. episode 2 was incredible. i can't wait for more. this is so up my alley it's ridiculous.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    W/A
    Posts
    3,177
    Mentioned
    98 Post(s)
    He's been answering some questions over on Goodreads regarding the show.

    Did you originally plan to have Lovecraft Country as a television series? I thought the episodic structure of the segments certainly lended themselves for that idea.


    Matt Ruff Yes, I initially conceived of Lovecraft Country as a potential TV series back in 2007. (My elevator pitch was, “It’s The X-Files, if Mulder and Scully were black travel writers living in the Jim Crow era.”) The people I was talking to passed on the idea, but the story stayed with me, and I decided to try to make it work as a book.

    A part of the original TV show concept I wanted to preserve was this “monster of the week” element where each member of my ensemble cast would get to star in their own reimagined weird tale. I didn’t want to write a short story collection, though, I wanted to write a novel. Eventually I hit on the idea of an episodic novel – basically a TV season in literary form, that you would binge-read instead of binge-watching, and whose individual episodes would gradually be revealed to all be pieces of the same arc story.





    Obviously in structuring the novel this way, I hoped that the finished book might also serve as a proof of concept for a possible TV series, but I knew that was a longshot and I certainly never expected it to work out as well as it has.
    I liked this answer to the question about a white guy thinking he can write a black book:

    In light of the #ownvoices movement, I'd love to hear from you as a white author writing Lovecraft Country about the experience of Black characters. How did you get comfortable with telling this story? What limitations did you become aware of, during and after the process? What are you learning from having the story adapted by Black writers & producers? Anything you would do differently? Any intuitions that paid off?




    Matt Ruff I grew up in a multicultural theological debate society. My father was a Lutheran minister, originally from the Midwest. My mother, a missionary’s daughter, was born in southern Brazil and raised in Argentina during the Peron era. Our house in New York City served as Ellis Island for a nonstop parade of immigrating South American relatives. Most of my mother’s people were Lutheran, but a few – like my maternal grandmother, who lived with us for many years – were converts to Mormonism. And they all loved to argue.

    The upshot of all this is that I learned at an early age that I’d be spending my time on this planet surrounded by people who didn’t see eye-to-eye with me, or with each other, and that there was value in learning to understand other perspectives. And my writing reflects this: My novels are all over the place in terms of genre and subject matter, but they often involve some sort of culture clash, and most of my protagonists come from different backgrounds and have different beliefs and worldviews than I do.

    I realize that the issue of white authors writing from black perspectives is a particularly fraught one right now, but to me, what I was doing in Lovecraft Country is a natural extension of what I’ve always done: use the power of fiction to understand other ways of looking at and living in the world. I wouldn’t say I was “comfortable” doing this – it’s always good to be a little nervous, so I don’t get lazy – but I was reasonably confident that I could do justice to the characters, or that if I couldn’t, I’d figure that out before I embarrassed myself publicly.

    The biggest challenge wasn’t the characters, but the history. I’d turn things up in my research that were hard to wrap my head around at first. Like the idea of whites-only ambulances that would literally let black people bleed to death rather than lift a finger to help them – that sounds like something out of dystopian science fiction, but in large parts of 1950s America it was just how things worked. So that was the tricky part, learning the rules of this strange country that my protagonists were trying to make their way in. Once I had that down, figuring out how intelligent, resourceful human beings would respond and adapt was relatively straightforward. And of course I had plenty of real-life examples – anecdotes and stories of how people coped – to draw on.

    As for what I would do differently in hindsight, it’s still too soon to say. Ask me again in ten years, and I might have some thoughts, but for now I’m really happy with the way the novel turned out.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Republic of Texas
    Posts
    6,765
    Mentioned
    471 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by eversonpoe View Post
    sorry, i'm not trying to be a dick, but if you think the racism aspect was overdone, you don't know anything about US history. sundown towns were a real thing that existed in all parts of the country for a long, long time.
    i've rarely left Texas.
    I'm 40.
    And, "don't let the sun set on your black ass in 'such and such town' signs" are something that i actually saw still standing, in the 80s, in some of the tiny towns out here.
    Nowadays, yes, we have Austin (which is about as hip as it gets, anywhere,) and DFW, and Houston, and San Antonio, and El Paso, and even Amarillo, that are generally pretty fucking tolerant and progressive.

    But we've ALSO got places like Grand Saline. It's in Van Zandt; i've lived in that area (specifically in Wills Point and Ben Wheeler.)
    Grand Saline has been, like, a KKK stronghold, since the end of the civil war. I've seen "Ni**er, don't let the sun set..." painted on barns and shit, in Grand Saline.
    I've seen motherfuckers with Klan bumper stickers out in rural East Texas.

    NOW.
    I LOVE Texas.
    If you think you've been to some sort of music event that was cooler than what we've got going on in Austin, well, come see. You'll likely change your mind.
    But, it's still a battle. There are still a bunch of traditionally racist fuckheads around. We're getting CLOSE, like, 49/51, with tolerance and such, vs intolerance.
    But at least we ain't fucking Mississippi or West Virginia.
    STILL, the nastiness continues.

    PLEASE don't get upset with me for asking, but, where do you live, @Kodiak33 , where the racial aspect of the show seems foreign?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    W/A
    Posts
    3,177
    Mentioned
    98 Post(s)
    OK, I take some umbrage with your WV snipe but then I recall where I grew up. I lived on a state park that every summer would host an African-American Heritage Arts Camp (their words) and the black population of the area would grow by a couple thousand percent from 0 to ~1500 or so kids. Never had an issue with it, my dad was great friends with the guy who ran it and I would stay over at their house every now and then because the son and I were friends as well. Anyway, they would bring kids from bigger parts of the state in for a not-really roughing it experience with art and music and dance and just a ton of things that culminated in a Saturday recital-ish thing. It was always fun and exciting to be around for these.

    Then came the first summer I was a life guard. You see, there is another state park that is about a 20 minute drive away and there's an old-fashioned outdoor pool there. One day of the camp all of the kids would get to go to this pool for free. I never thought about it until I was a life guard but there are people from all over who are staying in the cabins at this park. There are the locals who swim there because it's the only pool for roughly an hour drive in any direction. Then you have a couple hundred black kids who just descend on the place for a couple hours.

    The other three life guards would talk the most insane shit, like talking about stringing them up on their truck and other violent things. And this was a five-foot-nothing little blonde girl. The other two were almost as bad, and it was something I wish I could have had the strength to talk to them about not being a racist piece of shit. I mean, when they're that vehement you tend to stay out of their way yeah? But I think about this a lot because of that and what the world is like now. I wonder what kind of person they grew to be? I mean the older two were already old enough that they're probably in their 50s or 60s now (it's been 25 years since I was last there working) and the other is in her 40s.

    At least with the local kids I was able to talk to them about it when they were trying to be shitty. I like to hope that they are better people now for that, but also I know they probably saw things that their friends did - and were 'rewarded' for doing - in the intervening years and were empowered by it.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Republic of Texas
    Posts
    6,765
    Mentioned
    471 Post(s)
    I'm sorry @allegate , if you're from West Virginia.

    And, I'm sure people think of tx the same way I think of that state.

    DO note, at least, that I talked about there being awful racism where I've lived in Texas, too.

    We've still got a DFW suburb called White Settlement.
    Last edited by elevenism; 08-25-2020 at 09:46 PM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    W/A
    Posts
    3,177
    Mentioned
    98 Post(s)
    No worries. As I said, it's more a matter of immediate denial and "it's not like that!" but then you think about it a little more and realize it's way more like that if you just think and dig a little deeper.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bayonne Leave It Alone
    Posts
    4,339
    Mentioned
    80 Post(s)
    that second episode was crazy. The dialogue is kinda heavy handed but im sticking with this bc clearly it has some big ideas theyre shooting for.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    2,054
    Mentioned
    49 Post(s)
    Loved the Indiana Jones style episode. So damn good!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Posts
    89
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    They use Manson a lot on the soundtrack for this.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Bayonne Leave It Alone
    Posts
    4,339
    Mentioned
    80 Post(s)
    Pretty sure I'm done with this. Not the tone or direction i was hoping for at all.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    New York, New York
    Posts
    3,641
    Mentioned
    80 Post(s)
    Yea, the show is kinda losing me. I honestly don't care much for this overarching story. It's just not gripping me, making me wonder and ask questions. And each episode just feels random. It ain't terrible, but it's just not gripping me. When an episode ends, I'm not like, "Oh, I can't wait for next week!" And I don't find my girl and I discussing it afterwards like other shows. We only seem to be watching it because, well, we've watched it this far.

Posting Permissions