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Thread: The Transgender Thread

  1. #31
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    Yeah, I meant woman. I mean, just for sheer physicality: if you're going to strip someone who's biologically female bare, you're going to see a woman. She's bound to be feminine just in her physicality. I don't know if that's making sense. I'm sure they meant feminine as in 'soft and vulnerable', but that's not what I first thought of

  2. #32
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    The bare sex is female, and you can't have inherent femininity in a female, because femininity is tied to sexuality, not sex. You can have inherent femininity in a woman, though, because the social construct of woman (gender) is the sum of a trend in femininities. So indeed, as you said, you would expect a woman to be feminine, but you shouldn't expect a female to be feminine.

    A woman is bound* to be feminine, but you can't strip female to get woman - it's the other way around. To say that stripping a female bare will result in seeing a woman is to presume that all females inherently possess a string of gendered traits, which I'm not sure I would agree with. I think females perhaps have a social predisposition to those traits, but that's an external coat, not something you find when you strip them to their core. The only thing you can be certain you're going to see when it comes to females is their XX chromosone pair and all the tangibly biological side-effects of that. Hence the distinction between transsexual and transgender.




    *oh look at my clever literary use of the word bound /smug/

  3. #33
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    That sounded way too clever for this time of night (yeah, it's already past my bedtime - how sad am I?) BUT I think I know what happened: in Dutch there's no different word for woman and (a) female. So I tend to use 'vrouw' (woman) for biological sex and 'vrouwelijk' (feminine) for anything that has to do with gender. I sometimes forget to correct that when I translate my thoughts to English. So what I meant is that when my friends called her too 'vrouwelijk', I automatically thougt 'Well, she's 'vrouw', isn't she?'
    Does that clear it up?
    [Also, I know it's incredibly biased to assume that a female body (bio-sex) has some kind of recognizable female traits, but sadly I can't help myself when it comes to that.]

    I thought this was rather appropriate given our discussion:

    I have a number of friends who are negotiating the reverse of this, in that they for a long time identified as lesbians and have now started dating transmen and now have to negotiate the awkwardness of being in what ostensibly looks like a heterosexual relationship. I’ve been around several friends who, when they mention their boyfriend in a queer setting, reflexively say, “Oh, but he’s trans.”
    And I think that really points as well to the fact that these are constructed categories. This is about your subjectivity, it’s about your allegiance, it’s about where your social networks are, it’s about the kinds of cultural priorities that you embrace and that you endorse. This is not just what gets you hard or what gets you wet. This is not just about what kinds of sex you have, or the congenital configurations of the people you have sex with. It’s very much about what cultures you participate in. What cultures you ally yourself with, you know, whose flag you fly.
    Last edited by Elke; 01-22-2012 at 03:40 PM. Reason: found article

  4. #34
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    Oh! That's very interesting. I think it's the same in Greek. I had that 3 prong definition drilled into me from the start, so it's like the fundamental framework for all my studies.

    I'm curious to look up the definitions in a bunch of languages now.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elke
    First of all, theruiner, thank you for trying to explain what it's like for you.
    No prob. And thank you for being so kind about it and coming in to clear things up. I appreciate it. I don't really want to continue talking about it myself, so I'm going to extract myself from the conversation. Not trying to stop it from happening or anything, I'm just taking myself out of it. But I did want to say a quick thanks.


    Quote Originally Posted by allegro
    You are a female, right?
    I'm not upset by this comment or anything, and I don't mean for it to come off that way, but I just wanted to clarify that I don't consider myself female. I don't necessarily think I'm not, either. I just don't know at this point. Not a big deal, but I just wanted to clarify.


    Truthfully, the only thing I've felt is bad for you because you seem to struggle so much with this, and you haven't gotten any professional help. It's obviously a big struggle for you, often. Big enough that maybe somebody could help you talk about it, who specializes in this.
    Much appreciated. Thank you.
    Last edited by theruiner; 01-22-2012 at 08:28 PM.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by theruiner View Post
    I'm not upset by this comment or anything, and I don't mean for it to come off that way, but I just wanted to clarify that I don't consider myself female. I don't necessarily think I'm not, either. I just don't know at this point.
    And that's totally cool. You don't have to ever know, and you can be both or either or neither, and nobody in this thread will care or judge you. But do know that we care about you and we hope that you find a way to deal with your struggle and get professional help to get you through it?

    I also want to take this opportunity to, again, publicly proclaim my love for Elke. I think we were separated at birth. (Even though my birth was way the fuck earlier during the time of the dinosaurs.) The childhood upbringing you described in your post was very similar to mine. Oh, and we were engaged several times.

    Also, props to Icklekitty for such awesome posts in this and other similar gender threads. I'm relieved to be among such open-minded gender-neutral educated egalitarians.

    Finally, my compliments to Hula for really bringing some great points of honesty and cool poignancy to this thread, much appreciated, much respected. You are awesome.

    Edit: Jesus, I sound like I'm on Ecstacy. Wtf.
    Last edited by allegro; 01-23-2012 at 08:04 AM.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by allegro View Post
    And that's totally cool. You don't have to ever know, and you can be both or either or neither, and nobody in this thread will care or judge you. But do know that we care about you and we hope that you find a way to deal with your struggle and get professional help to get you through it.
    Well, thank you. Yeah, a professional is the only way I'm going to be able to figure this out. And I do appreciate that it doesn't matter to anyone else, but it's really important to me to figure it out and figure out what I'm going to do about it. Sooner rather than later. But that requires insurance and money and I have neither at the moment, so it'll have to wait.

    And for the record (and this is not directed at you, allegro, just in general), and not to dredge up anything from yesterday, but I absolutely, one-hundred percent agree that gender norms or rules are bullshit. Not that I care what people do, or how they want to be, but our society would be much better if we could just let everyone be who they are instead of who we want them to be. Whether or not that will ever happen, who knows. Probably not in my lifetime.
    Last edited by theruiner; 01-23-2012 at 12:22 AM.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by allegro View Post
    Finally, my compliments to Hula for really bringing some great points of honesty and cool poignancy to this thread, much appreciated, much respected. You are awesome.
    Fuelled by rage with society, fuck yeah!

    Firstly I'm just going to say that I've been away for the weekend so I'm really tired and might not be as eloquent as this thread deserves. I was up until almost 2 last night explaining my whole situation with that friend I mentioned here a couple posts ago and I left that particular conversation mentally exhausted and emotionally drained. Maybe it's worth it; I think he understands now. I hope so, at least.

    Allegro: I do agree with a lot of your views on gender as a social construct. It's something that has fascinated me since I first started reading about women in literature (both as authors and characters) and I feel like the world is far from how I'd like it to be in that respect.

    On Saturday I saw a burlesque show in which one of my favourite webcomic authors, who is a transman, performed in drag doing strip tease. The whole point of his skit was to display awkward sensuality and he succeeded there—what really got me thinking, though, was that this man could so comfortable don women's clothing and perform in such a (humorously) coquettish, feminine manner and look at once sensual and very much masculine. I'm not going to make assumptions about his gender identity in daily life as to be honest I don't know a whole lot about him outside of his webcomic and his transition, but I was blown away that a person who probably suffered terrible gender dysphoria at some point in his life could go up on stage and dress up in such a way—stripping, of all things—without feeling uncomfortable.

    Oddly, the performance didn't make me feel more content with the idea of adopting a masculine persona whilst still presenting as a female physically... If anything, it made me feel worse because I was envious of what he had. This is the first time I've felt that way about a transman; usually I catch myself trying to see the physical characteristics in them that might set them out as trans—the narrow shoulders, the wide hips, the soft jawline. He had none of these things and he was a very real image of what I could be, right down to the fact that he could dress up in drag so freely and easily without falling into dysphoria.

    Here's where I think I disagree with some of what allegro said:

    I don't feel like my gender dysphoria is entirely a gender thing, and to be honest I've never liked the DSM definition of gender identity disorder as a mental illness wherein one's gender identity doesn't match up with their physical sex. I don't know nearly enough about psychology or biology to be able to weigh in on what it is exactly that brings about transgenderism, but from my experience I grew up to be socialised as a girl (for the most—my mum's always been good when it comes to gender neutrality and she makes a point of buying my niece dinosaurs and cars for her birthday as those are what she actually LIKES, not what society says she's supposed to play with) and yet I identify with men more than I do women. I don't know if that's because I don't like women as society has created them to be; I don't know if it's because I don't act or talk or think like the stereotypical women. What I do know is that the gender binary in society only upsets me on a philosophical level; I get annoyed when people tell me to 'man up' not because it's hurtful when you take my situation into consideration, but because I consider it to be sexist. Likewise I silently seethe at work when mothers tell their sons to 'put that back, it's a girl's toy' not because I consider myself to be a male who likes feminine things, but because it sickens me that mothers would actually shape their children's minds in such an archaic way.

    I feel like it's not my gender and my physical sex that don't match up; it's more like the me running around in my head is a guy who looks exactly like I do on the outside, only without the breasts or vagina and with a voice just a tiny bit deeper. I suppose I relate to what theruiner said about being a woman for years and then waking up as a man (except in reverse, obviously), except it's only when I'm confronted with the image of myself or with my naked body in the flesh that I stop being the man that I grew up to be and become the woman I feel I was never supposed to be. When I look in the mirror, I'm not saddened by what I see because it's not what I want to see... I look in the mirror and it's wrong, because those breasts don't belong to me and when the hell did I get so short, anyway? Who the hell am I even looking at?

    I've tried being a tomboy. I've tried being a boi (in the sense that I identified as male but had no intention of medically transitioning). I've tried being a regular ol' cis girl who plays Xbox and watches extreme sports and prefers the company of her lad friends over that of other girls, but none of these things have worked for me in the long run because they don't address the real issue. My body sickens me. It's not that I want a penis instead; it's that what I have between my legs makes me feel physically ill to the point that I can't orgasm if I'm not using all my energy to keep from thinking about my body. I think sometimes that I'd be happy if I had male genitalia but while I appreciate penises from an aesthetic (and erotic) point of view, I feel like I'd be more comfortable being flat and smooth like a Barbie doll. I don't think that's a societal thing—I never went through the whole drama of being conditioned to think that sex is dirty and that masturbation is bad. If anything, I've always considered myself a sensual person right up until the point that my knickers/boxers come off and suddenly I'm faced with what I really am. I've held off going to a gender therapist because I don't honestly know if I could go on hormone therapy and grow facial hair and get a deeper voice only for my genitalia to remain exactly the same. The thought of other transmen being like this doesn't gross me out, but when I picture it for myself it repulses me.

    Do I think I'd be the way I am if humans were all socially identical and just had different junk under our unisex clothes? Probably not, but then I think society as a whole would question why some humans have innies and others have outies. Sex would likely still set us apart; the very act of penetrative sex is, in and of itself, a weighted one because there's something so forceful about penetration and something so vulnerable about opening yourself up to that (whether as a female or a bottoming male or somebody giving a blowjob). I don't even know if a completely genderless society could function, even if it weren't for the physical disparities (strength, height and so on) that exist between males and females.

    Maybe there is something in my brain that makes me different than other people born female. It would make sense of the fact that I've been comporting myself like 'one of the guys' for the past year and a half ever since coming out to someone for the first time, and yet I still don't feel at home in my body. It would make sense of the fact that I've been flipping the bird at 'gender' quite happily, that I've been told by queers and straight people who admitted to knowing nothing about the LGBT community alike that I seem 'cool' and 'really comfortable in my own skin', and yet I go to sleep almost every night feeling incomplete—feeling like a piece of broken machinery.

    I didn't intend for this to turn into such a long, rambling lecture in self-pity—talking to my friend so frankly last night reopened the floodgates on things that I've tried to bottle up for entirely too long. I suppose if I had to summarise, I'd say this: I don't think I'm uncomfortable with my gender, because my gender is just that—mine, regardless of whether it's perceived as male or female or neither or both. If the roots of my transgenderism lay in the fact that I feel uncomfortable being forced into the 'girly' side of the gender binary, my problems would have ceased to exist the moment I cut all my hair off and started wearing boyish clothes only to discover that nobody was trying to get me to be a girly girl again.
    Last edited by Hula; 01-23-2012 at 12:16 PM.

  9. #39
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    Wow, that was quite a read Hula. Thanks for that.
    One thing you said struck me though: Do I think I'd be the way I am if humans were all socially identical and just had different junk under our unisex clothes? Probably not, but then I think society as a whole would question why some humans have innies and others have outies.

    I think of a gender neutral world as the exact opposite of that: every single human being completely uniquely themselves however they want to be, without being reduced to one category. The junk is significant, as you yourself indicate so well, and it should be: every part of your body should be significant, and everything you express through it, every possibiliy it opens to you and every way it limits you. What we do right now, to me, is hiding bodies and their symbolic encriptions under masks and layers of clothing, or sculpt them into something they're not. We hide them all the time.
    But that's a different discussion

    Also allegro: right back atcha babe. (I still think our last break-up was a mistake, but who knows...)
    Last edited by Elke; 01-23-2012 at 03:32 PM. Reason: can't spell

  10. #40
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    That sounds like a great ideal—the only problem is I think it's human nature (hell, maybe just animal nature) to group together with those who are most like us—you'd probably still get clumps of people identifying with each other more than others and you'd be back to square one. I feel like the queer movement as it stands right now is trying to push society toward what you describe, though. Words like 'gay' and 'straight' are becoming too constrictive for some people and while identities like 'pansexual' are still trapping us into using labels which define us in black or white (instead of just being and not feeling the need to explain or justify it), they're good in the sense that they do acknowledge and include gender neutrality.

    I've always liked 'queer' as a sexual orientation / gender identity. It's everything and nothing. I think that's nice.
    Last edited by Hula; 01-23-2012 at 03:57 PM.

  11. #41
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    Dropping in because this came up on my news feed, and it's something worth noting for y'all if you fly in Canada: http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/regula.../FullText.html

    5.2 (1) An air carrier shall not transport a passenger if
    • (c) the passenger does not appear to be of the gender indicated on the identification he or she presents;



  12. #42
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    I first read that as "doesn't present as the gender they appear to be" or something, then re-read it and realized I misunderstood it. From a practical standpoint, for transsexuals who decide to transition, it probably won't be much of an issue. When people transition and start living in their preferred gender role full time, one of the first things they do is change their I.D. from their birth gender to their "new" one. It's relatively easy (though I don't know how difficult changing that over might be internationally).

    Now, that's just from a practical standpoint, speaking specifically for that situation. From a philosophical standpoint, arbitrary gender rules are bullshit. Everyone should be able to dress however they want, and who is anyone else to tell them "you can't dress that way" or "that's only for one gender and not the other." So a guy shows up in a dress and his I.D. doesn't say female so now they're going to play fashion police and say no, you can't get on, because only women are allowed to wear dresses? Says fucking who? I understand the need for security, and really, this is a huge societal problem, not specific to this law, but it's still crap.
    Last edited by theruiner; 01-30-2012 at 09:38 PM.

  13. #43
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    Indeed, I was aware body scanners could "out" people (yay invasive technology...), but I didn't know such actions would kick someone off the flight. And hell, that can cover andro, genderqueer, TV and a hell of a lot of other people based on the various bigotry of the guard interpreting policy.

  14. #44
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    A couple of pics from the Erotic Heritage Museum in Las Vegas which might interest you:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/silktwi...57629203017295

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/silktwi...57629203017295

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by icklekitty View Post
    A couple of pics from the Erotic Heritage Museum in Las Vegas which might interest you:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/silktwi...57629203017295

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/silktwi...57629203017295
    I love Buck Angel. He's super fucking nice, I interviewed him via e-mail a few semesters back for a paper I did, and we've kept in contact since.

  16. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by theruiner View Post
    When people transition and start living in their preferred gender role full time, one of the first things they do is change their I.D. from their birth gender to their "new" one. It's relatively easy (though I don't know how difficult changing that over might be internationally).
    Don't quote me on this, because I haven't looked into it myself, but my ex's partner is FtM as well, and she told me that when she was looking into things for him, she found out that in NY state, in order to get the gender marker changed on your license, you have to have undergone surgery.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sick among the pure View Post
    Don't quote me on this, because I haven't looked into it myself, but my ex's partner is FtM as well, and she told me that when she was looking into things for him, she found out that in NY state, in order to get the gender marker changed on your license, you have to have undergone surgery.
    It varies from place to place. In Sweden, you have to undergo sterilisation to have the marker changed. In some places it's enough to have been in gender therapy; in others you have to have undergone varying levels of surgery (top, bottom or, in places, both). I don't think it's even possible to do it in Ireland—and they're rolling out legislation that'll have us all jumping through hoops, anyway. Then there's all the ridiculous legislation about when you're allowed to actually undergo hormone therapy—some countries want you to officially live X amount of time as your preferred gender before they'll ever let you begin to medically transition. Bull. Shit.

    It...kind of sucks to have to go through surgery to be considered 'genuinely' transgender. What about all the people who are trans but perfectly happy with their junk? It's appalling that people should be forced to undergo terrifying and expensive procedures in order to have one tiny thing altered on their identification that could ultimately affect whether they'll ever be considered employable. There might be all sorts of anti-discrimination legislation out there, but that doesn't mean a whole lot in the real world. Then there's the whole issue of if you're trying to live as stealth—maybe you just don't want people to know you were ever legally any other gender than the one by which you present.

    Ugh. It's like I skipped past all the gay-bashing growing up so now the world's making it up to me and all the other trans folk by being twice as brutal.

  18. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hula View Post
    Then there's all the ridiculous legislation about when you're allowed to actually undergo hormone therapy—some countries want you to officially live X amount of time as your preferred gender before they'll ever let you begin to medically transition. Bull. Shit.
    That's where I think the rules are truly moronic. How are you supposed to live any amount of time passing if you're unable to take hormones? I know some people are androgynous enough that the right hair cut, clothes, and way of acting can be enough. But for me, and I'm sure countless others, it's impossible to pass without some sort of medical help. Hell, I've been lucky enough to start on testosterone almost a full month ago, but it'll be a while before it helps get me to a "passable as male" state because of my voice and feminine facial structure. Once my voice lowers, and I finally get some stubble going, then I face my biggest obstacle. Pun kinda intended. I'm kinda stuck, because doctor's won't remove my chest without living a year as a passable male, but I can't pass as a male with my E cups. I could probably get a reduction for other medical reasons, then compress those enough to be ok, but that means two surgeries, twice the cost, twice the healing time, and twice the scar tissue.
    I have a compression top, which helps, but I still have a noticeably female chest. I've even tried using an ace bandage over my compression top, then a tank top over that to help all the contours blend together, all of that under a loose t-shirt, and then a hoodie over top, and I look halfway between a chick with a deformed chest, and a dude that's only really fat around his abdomen. :|
    I've been exercising, they still won't shrink down any. </ihatemybodyrant>

    Can someone please explain why I have to be able to pass for X amount of time BEFORE I CAN GET SOMETHING TO HELP ME PASS?

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    I think they want to try to eliminate those people for whom this isn't really a transgender problem and to be sure that the surgery etc isn't going to get reversed later. But you're right, the practice doesn't match the intent and they need to find a better system to work out those things.

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    I've had moments where it's occurred to me that it's really a good thing they don't just hand out hormones to anybody who presents with transgender tendencies—I mean holy shit, I've flip-flopped on this more often than I care to admit... But on the flip side, the lengths we have to go to in order to prove that we're serious about this are incredibly daunting. They have to be 100% sure we're 100% sure, but when it seems in the current climate as though you'll get rejected for treatment if you don't present as the archetype of a straight manly man or womanly woman, quite often it feels as though it's not worth the effort. I daren't even go to a gender therapist because I'm worried I'll have the door slammed in my face the second I stroll in there with my bootcut jeans and earrings. You'd be amazed how many testimonials there are out there of transguys essentially lying about their history and their current lives out of fear that they won't seem trans enough.

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    So I'm gonna use this thread to vent a little bit and I hope I don't offend anyone. My roommate and good friend of 8 years recently came out to me as FTM transsexual. He is going to start taking testosterone soon and would like everyone to start calling him by a new name in keeping with his different gender. I care deeply about my friend. He's had a hard row to hoe and I hope this change will give him some of the peace he needs. However I am having a really hard time remembering to refer to him as "he" rather than "she" in conversations and to use his new name rather than the one I have known him by for the last 8 years. I slip up every now and then and I tell him I'm sorry but I still know it hurts his feelings. I'm not trying to be mean but 8 years is a long time and my memory isn't that great to start with...

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    Don't beat yourself up over it. That's a very ingrained thing in your mind, and I'm sure it's difficult for people to try to use the opposite pronouns when they've been using the other ones for years. The important thing is that you're trying, and it sounds like you're a really supportive friend. One of the things I always hear from people who have transitioned is, "Get ready to lose almost everyone you care about." There's a big fear with a lot of people that their friends and family will abandon them, and a lot of times that does happen. So it's great that you're trying to be a supportive friend. You'll get the pronoun thing down, it'll just take a little time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theruiner View Post
    Don't beat yourself up over it. That's a very ingrained thing in your mind, and I'm sure it's difficult for people to try to use the opposite pronouns when they've been using the other ones for years. The important thing is that you're trying, and it sounds like you're a really supportive friend. One of the things I always hear from people who have transitioned is, "Get ready to lose almost everyone you care about." There's a big fear with a lot of people that their friends and family will abandon them, and a lot of times that does happen. So it's great that you're trying to be a supportive friend. You'll get the pronoun thing down, it'll just take a little time.
    Thanks. I'm getting better about it and he's actually one of the lucky ones whose parents haven't disowned him and are pretty supportive, at least financially.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brightshadow View Post
    So I'm gonna use this thread to vent a little bit and I hope I don't offend anyone. My roommate and good friend of 8 years recently came out to me as FTM transsexual. He is going to start taking testosterone soon and would like everyone to start calling him by a new name in keeping with his different gender. I care deeply about my friend. He's had a hard row to hoe and I hope this change will give him some of the peace he needs. However I am having a really hard time remembering to refer to him as "he" rather than "she" in conversations and to use his new name rather than the one I have known him by for the last 8 years. I slip up every now and then and I tell him I'm sorry but I still know it hurts his feelings. I'm not trying to be mean but 8 years is a long time and my memory isn't that great to start with...
    There was quite a few people who i go to school with, who all changed pronouns around the same time, it was really rough remembering to switch. Thankfully my friends would correct me politely without getting insulted...

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    I came out to my mom last night. I think she took it ok, she was tired and said we'd talk about it more today. All I really got out of her is that she doesn't understand but she loves me, which is much better than I thought, but I also didn't get to mentioning starting T, or wanting to get my boobs chopped off asap. I feel like the physical transition will be the worst part for her.

  26. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by sick among the pure View Post
    I came out to my mom last night. I think she took it ok, she was tired and said we'd talk about it more today. All I really got out of her is that she doesn't understand but she loves me, which is much better than I thought, but I also didn't get to mentioning starting T, or wanting to get my boobs chopped off asap. I feel like the physical transition will be the worst part for her.
    One thing I figured out when I came out to my mum is that it's important to lay out (at some point—take it as slowly as you think you need to, for her sake) exactly what being trans will actually mean for you in the long run. I told my mum I'm trans, and from the stuff she spouted about hating ~labels~ and thinking it's damaging to ~conform to gender roles~ I got the impression she didn't understand that I actually want a male body. It's a lot easier to discuss gender with her now in general, so that's the good that came of opening up about it in the first place, but I know that if/when I decide to medically transition, I'll probably have to sit her down and talk to her about it again. In-depth, this time.

    Moral of the story: it might feel like you've cleared the air, but just make sure you do tell her what transitioning will ultimately consist of so that she can't delude herself into thinking this issue is less life-changing than it actually is.

  27. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hula View Post
    One thing I figured out when I came out to my mum is that it's important to lay out (at some point—take it as slowly as you think you need to, for her sake) exactly what being trans will actually mean for you in the long run. I told my mum I'm trans, and from the stuff she spouted about hating ~labels~ and thinking it's damaging to ~conform to gender roles~ I got the impression she didn't understand that I actually want a male body. It's a lot easier to discuss gender with her now in general, so that's the good that came of opening up about it in the first place, but I know that if/when I decide to medically transition, I'll probably have to sit her down and talk to her about it again. In-depth, this time.

    Moral of the story: it might feel like you've cleared the air, but just make sure you do tell her what transitioning will ultimately consist of so that she can't delude herself into thinking this issue is less life-changing than it actually is.
    I plan on it, once we get a chance to continue the conversation. Just saying that since we hadn't gotten to that yet, so I'm not out of the woods.

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    I have an assignment coming up in a few weeks where I have to be a fake gallery curator. I have to put together a group of images that I would put in this fake gallery. Photography, painting, sculpture, any medium I want, as long as it all goes with a central theme.

    My theme is going to be trans-related in some way. Haven't pin-pointed it in a statement yet. But basically trans struggles, both with rights, and with who we are, etc.

    So, the point of me bringing this up, I'd like some input. Does anyone here have a piece or series of work related to transpeople that you think I should look into including? Any visual medium, including short video clips (which could be projected and looped on a wall in a gallery setting).

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    Ohh, crap. Magtig was telling me about a trans artist he was working with. She works with video, but I can't remember her fucking name.

    Your project sounds fun. I had to do something similar for my curation course, but a shortlist of pieces had been predetermined.

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    Quote Originally Posted by icklekitty View Post
    Ohh, crap. Magtig was telling me about a trans artist he was working with. She works with video, but I can't remember her fucking name.

    Your project sounds fun. I had to do something similar for my curation course, but a shortlist of pieces had been predetermined.
    That would be Zackary Drucker. She's kinda brilliant, kinda funny, and totally hot.

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