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Thread: What Was The Rollout For Pretty Hate Machine???

  1. #31
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    Not sure if this may interest you but I have a a copy of the Head Like A Hole EP/Single/whatever you wanna call it, it has a little more information card inside in the style of a takeout food menu comparing each artist of TVT to a type of meal so for instance "Gil-Scott Heron black eyed peas", "Modern English" muffin.etc They compared NIN to the Pu Pu Platter. I wonder if that was diss at all?

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobCoz98 View Post
    Not sure if this may interest you but I have a a copy of the Head Like A Hole EP/Single/whatever you wanna call it, it has a little more information card inside in the style of a takeout food menu comparing each artist of TVT to a type of meal so for instance "Gil-Scott Heron black eyed peas", "Modern English" muffin.etc They compared NIN to the Pu Pu Platter. I wonder if that was diss at all?
    Would you be able to post up the image?

  3. #33
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    It's easy to forget what the metal climate was in the early years of the 90s, but I know that in Europe it was a huge deal whenever NIN got on the pages of magazines such as Metal Hammer. There was a true pushback against "computer music" and it not being pure metal. Sounds laughable now, but it was a genuine issue, and music fans endlessly debated if you're a musician even if you're not playing a "real" instrument! It was serious!
    I think that's why there was not much love for NIN when they opened for Guns N Roses in 91, they were still seen as a computer band or synth band.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by hellospaceboy View Post
    It's easy to forget what the metal climate was in the early years of the 90s, but I know that in Europe it was a huge deal whenever NIN got on the pages of magazines such as Metal Hammer. There was a true pushback against "computer music" and it not being pure metal. Sounds laughable now, but it was a genuine issue, and music fans endlessly debated if you're a musician even if you're not playing a "real" instrument! It was serious!
    I think that's why there was not much love for NIN when they opened for Guns N Roses in 91, they were still seen as a computer band or synth band.
    In America the "real instrument" debate continued into the 2010s and only died after Skrillex got popular and EDM became the dominant music for a couple of years. As much as I dislike the genre as a whole, I'm glad it finally pushed that debate to the fringes and I no longer hear about it every time an electronic musician is brought up.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by hellospaceboy View Post
    It's easy to forget what the metal climate was in the early years of the 90s, but I know that in Europe it was a huge deal whenever NIN got on the pages of magazines such as Metal Hammer. There was a true pushback against "computer music" and it not being pure metal. Sounds laughable now, but it was a genuine issue, and music fans endlessly debated if you're a musician even if you're not playing a "real" instrument! It was serious!
    I think that's why there was not much love for NIN when they opened for Guns N Roses in 91, they were still seen as a computer band or synth band.
    I definitely see PHM as a synth record.

  6. #36
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    Yeah Pretty Hate Machine was a synth-pop record with guitars thrown on top. I love it but it was definitely pretty damn far from a metal album.

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