Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
Results 121 to 150 of 200

Thread: Sexual Asshatery in the News

  1. #121
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Laughingstock of the World (America)
    Posts
    2,308
    Mentioned
    52 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cashpiles View Post
    I think men will have to start reporting unwanted touching from women as well... I know some men feel like it's not something worthy of reporting...but if we are to be equal, we need to.
    Yeaaaaaaaaah. The day a woman makes an unsolicited and unwelcome sexual advance on me, I'll get right on that.

    (to clarify: I'm not saying I'd love any sexual advance from any woman. I'm saying the ratio of times men have done something to women versus the other way around is like 100,000 to 0.5)
    Last edited by theimage13; 11-30-2017 at 07:52 PM. Reason: attrocious grammar mistake made this incoherent

  2. #122
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Women DO make unsolicited sexual advances, especially when they are in groups or drunk (or both). Watching women behave in that kind of setting (in groups + alcohol) is very eye-opening. A good buddy of mine used to work at a strip club for ladies and he had the marks to prove it: lots of scratches and some bruises, when it was supposed to be just dancing and maybe feeling up.

    The difference is how men/women react to it.

    For a straight man, having a random woman grabbing your dick, pinching your ass, or trying to kiss you out of the blue is more or less the equivalent of a woman being given a new pair of shoes by a random stranger. Sure, it might not be your favourite pair of shoes, or you might not even like those shoes at all, but it doesnít hurt and itís not that big of a deal.

    Letís stop portraying women like their shit doesnít smell. They are as much of an asshole as men are, it just shows in different ways, but they are just as human, just as good, just as bad.

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,505
    Mentioned
    61 Post(s)
    I think there's a thing where women are (sometimes) considered less of a threat so men (sometimes) respond to it differently. I also think women don't feel the need to be as cognizant of their behavior (sometimes) because they feel like the possibility of being a creep doesn't apply to them. Also, if a woman does sexually assault a man, it's possible that the "are they going to kill me/beat me up" thing exists as a lower threat, but the shoes analogy makes me sad and I don't like it. I think the expectation of men responding that way can compound trauma for a lot of men.

  4. #124
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Laughingstock of the World (America)
    Posts
    2,308
    Mentioned
    52 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ton View Post
    I agree with a lot of this, it's just hard to find the way to say it without offending people in today's social climate. I know I'll get shit for this but it's hard for a man really to talk about their grievances without being ridiculed for it. It's such a weird thing, I don't even know how to describe it. You can't really get a word in or say anything. And I know women have every right to complain about their treatment, I am angry about what they have had to go through too. I have more women than men in my family, by far, and it's always affected me personally when I hear stories about abuse towards women. It's just that talking about your experience as a man is a weird thing and bad waters to tread, unfortunately. Again, not sure how to say it. We kind of get shut down before we make our point. Maybe we deserve it?


    ^^ This is the simplest way I can sum it up.

    Men can be, are sometimes are, victims of sexual abuse / assault. But it is so infinitesimally rare compared to men doing this to women. It's not an epidemic. It's not a worldwide, systemic plague that governs the lives of men the way that it governs the lives of women. There was a list of things that women usually "have" to do if they go out for a night on the town that men rarely even THINK about doing - things like guarding their drinks, checking in with friends, making sure their friends know where they'll be when they leave to meet a first date, having 9 and 1 already typed in on their phone when they're walking to their car. The comments section was full of stores where women put up with shit they don't deserve to put up with because they've been conditioned to take the safest, most passive route out in order to avoid a potentially life-threatening conflict.

    I was out for a walk in a wooded trail in a statistically safe / low-crime area in broad daylight the other day. A woman - clearly fit and probably able to easily kick my scrawny ass - was out running, came around a bend in the trail, looked visibly shocked at the sight of me (a man, alone), and veered as far away from me as the trail would allow. It was a wide trail; this was definitely not an "I don't want to accidentally knock him over" courtesy veer. A guy out running wouldn't react that way if he came across a woman out walking alone because there is NOTHING in his mind that's saying "oh god, what if this woman is one of the bad ones?".

    Stuff like this *sometimes* happens to men, but it's *always* happening to women. So when a man walks into a conversation about women being abused and makes any attempt to say "hey, what about us?", it's a little tone-deaf. Conversations about women being abused by men are about a global epidemic. Men being abused by women? No intelligent woman thinks that it doesn't happen, but they know that it's on such a massively different scale that it really just kind of seems like yet another example of men trying to make things about themselves.

    The best thing we can do is be allies. That doesn't mean stepping into a conversation about women being assaulted and trying to make it about how we're sometimes assaulted too. It means stepping into a conversation, acknowledging that there is a massive problem, and maybe asking what you can do to help make that problem go away. Look at it another way: you support equal treatment for people regardless of whether they're straight or gay, right? But let's say you're straight. You're not going to walk into a conversation about someone getting murdered for being gay and go "STRAIGHT PEOPLE GET MURDERED TOO!". But what you can do is acknowledge that they're facing discrimination, add your voice to the list of those who support and respect them, and raise that voice if they ask for help being heard.

    tl;dr: There's a time and a place to raise concerns about men being assaulted, and conversations about women being assaulted isn't that time or place. You can be an ally and a supporter without making it about you.





  5. #125
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by theimage13 View Post


    ^^ This is the simplest way I can sum it up.

    Men can be, are sometimes are, victims of sexual abuse / assault. But it is so infinitesimally rare compared to men doing this to women. It's not an epidemic. It's not a worldwide, systemic plague that governs the lives of men the way that it governs the lives of women. There was a list of things that women usually "have" to do if they go out for a night on the town that men rarely even THINK about doing - things like guarding their drinks, checking in with friends, making sure their friends know where they'll be when they leave to meet a first date, having 9 and 1 already typed in on their phone when they're walking to their car. The comments section was full of stores where women put up with shit they don't deserve to put up with because they've been conditioned to take the safest, most passive route out in order to avoid a potentially life-threatening conflict.

    I was out for a walk in a wooded trail in a statistically safe / low-crime area in broad daylight the other day. A woman - clearly fit and probably able to easily kick my scrawny ass - was out running, came around a bend in the trail, looked visibly shocked at the sight of me (a man, alone), and veered as far away from me as the trail would allow. It was a wide trail; this was definitely not an "I don't want to accidentally knock him over" courtesy veer. A guy out running wouldn't react that way if he came across a woman out walking alone because there is NOTHING in his mind that's saying "oh god, what if this woman is one of the bad ones?".

    Stuff like this *sometimes* happens to men, but it's *always* happening to women. So when a man walks into a conversation about women being abused and makes any attempt to say "hey, what about us?", it's a little tone-deaf. Conversations about women being abused by men are about a global epidemic. Men being abused by women? No intelligent woman thinks that it doesn't happen, but they know that it's on such a massively different scale that it really just kind of seems like yet another example of men trying to make things about themselves.

    The best thing we can do is be allies. That doesn't mean stepping into a conversation about women being assaulted and trying to make it about how we're sometimes assaulted too. It means stepping into a conversation, acknowledging that there is a massive problem, and maybe asking what you can do to help make that problem go away. Look at it another way: you support equal treatment for people regardless of whether they're straight or gay, right? But let's say you're straight. You're not going to walk into a conversation about someone getting murdered for being gay and go "STRAIGHT PEOPLE GET MURDERED TOO!". But what you can do is acknowledge that they're facing discrimination, add your voice to the list of those who support and respect them, and raise that voice if they ask for help being heard.

    tl;dr: There's a time and a place to raise concerns about men being assaulted, and conversations about women being assaulted isn't that time or place. You can be an ally and a supporter without making it about you.




    I agree with all of this and it's opened my eyes more actually. I am wrong in so many ways. I may feel bad about my mistakes and what I say but I'm trying to learn.

  6. #126
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    san fransisco
    Posts
    902
    Mentioned
    30 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tremolo View Post
    Women DO make unsolicited sexual advances, especially when they are in groups or drunk (or both). Watching women behave in that kind of setting (in groups + alcohol) is very eye-opening. A good buddy of mine used to work at a strip club for ladies and he had the marks to prove it: lots of scratches and some bruises, when it was supposed to be just dancing and maybe feeling up.

    The difference is how men/women react to it.

    For a straight man, having a random woman grabbing your dick, pinching your ass, or trying to kiss you out of the blue is more or less the equivalent of a woman being given a new pair of shoes by a random stranger. Sure, it might not be your favourite pair of shoes, or you might not even like those shoes at all, but it doesn’t hurt and it’s not that big of a deal.

    Let’s stop portraying women like their shit doesn’t smell. They are as much of an asshole as men are, it just shows in different ways, but they are just as human, just as good, just as bad.
    went back and forth to respond they do it to are bad foundations for discussion i don't dismiss it immediately like i do name calling here's things in life a re very rarely 1:1 to many variables on each side, at this point in history most things have been done, so I can justify any kind of behavior, no matter how foul, by saying but so and so did it. do women commit acts of sexual misconduct of course they do. does that excuse men. no. 90% percent of serial killers are white males. does that make serial killing OK?no.
    it goes a lot deeper than that, to lengthy to get into on an internet forum. but how we reward or punish people in our modern society. so when we see people behaving badly it's usually deeper than the action when we see rich people arrested for drunk driving, we go why didn't the get a cab or Uber. so when some like Matt gets busted who made 48 million a year not even in my comprehension, last time i checked that kind of cash could probably get you a pretty high end pro. who would act or do anything you wanted. when we see an pandemic of bad behavior, we have to look at causes and solutions, and building constructive dialogue, and before you call me a cuck lefty, snowflake bastard, it starts, at home teaching you sons the correct way to treat to treat woman with respect and equality. and yes that starts with you Mr. president, using the term pussy as term for woman is a derogatory slur and you should be called out on it, you are a bad example for your children and our country. OK I'm done for now. As per a discussion last night with someone who has kids of both genders. asked. So I guess we can't have hero's anymore? to which I explained yes, but also explain in non religious terms that all humans are flawed. why that behavior is wrong, what the right behavior would be. again sorry for being long winded.
    -Louie
    Last edited by Louie_Cypher; 12-02-2017 at 12:06 PM. Reason: the and they

  7. #127
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    I'll delete my post since it could be seen as offensive.

  8. #128
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Laughingstock of the World (America)
    Posts
    2,308
    Mentioned
    52 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tremolo View Post
    Women DO make unsolicited sexual advances, especially when they are in groups or drunk (or both). Watching women behave in that kind of setting (in groups + alcohol) is very eye-opening. A good buddy of mine used to work at a strip club for ladies and he had the marks to prove it: lots of scratches and some bruises, when it was supposed to be just dancing and maybe feeling up.

    The difference is how men/women react to it.

    For a straight man, having a random woman grabbing your dick, pinching your ass, or trying to kiss you out of the blue is more or less the equivalent of a woman being given a new pair of shoes by a random stranger. Sure, it might not be your favourite pair of shoes, or you might not even like those shoes at all, but it doesn’t hurt and it’s not that big of a deal.

    Let’s stop portraying women like their shit doesn’t smell. They are as much of an asshole as men are, it just shows in different ways, but they are just as human, just as good, just as bad.
    What the fuck are you talking about?

    First off all, that "new pair of shoes" bullshit is incredibly sexist. Fuck that.

    Second of all, let me be perfectly clear about this: if a drunk woman came up to me and grabbed my ass or my dick or tried to make a move on me, my reactions would be one of the below, in no particular order:
    1) Try to find a friend of hers who appears sober and get the woman some help sobering up,
    2) Brush it off entirely and ignore it (while still being pissed off about it), or
    3) Tell her in no uncertain terms to fuck off because I'm not interested in some drunk woman sexually harassing me (note, I would have to already be in a really, really bad mood and probably actually know the woman - it's not in my nature to get angry with strangers)

    Let me be perfectly clear about what my reaction would NOT be:
    1) This is great!
    2) This is pretty good.
    3) This is remotely acceptable behavior that I am not completely upset about.

    Let's stop portraying sexual harassment as something that's GOOD if a woman does it to a man. That's the dumbest shit I've ever heard. And let's stop the idiotic "women love shoes" sexist bullshit stereotypes while we're at it. They're not helping anybody.

  9. #129
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by playwithfire View Post
    I think there's a thing where women are (sometimes) considered less of a threat so men (sometimes) respond to it differently. I also think women don't feel the need to be as cognizant of their behavior (sometimes) because they feel like the possibility of being a creep doesn't apply to them. Also, if a woman does sexually assault a man, it's possible that the "are they going to kill me/beat me up" thing exists as a lower threat, but the shoes analogy makes me sad and I don't like it. I think the expectation of men responding that way can compound trauma for a lot of men.
    A bit of comedic relief. Itís just a silly analogy, please donít take it literally.

  10. #130
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,505
    Mentioned
    61 Post(s)
    Well, I'm not taking it seriously that, no, I do not think that you think the average man processes being groped unwanted in an equivalent way to being handed shoes.

    I *am* taking it seriously in the sense that, that mentality or the expectation of that mentality from men, is commonplace. And the fact that it is commonplace is sad and harmful.

    While you may have framed it in a way that was attempted to be humorous, I don't think my response is any more literal than your initial comment, which while it did contain a joke, does illustrate a line of thinking that is problematic and pervasive.

  11. #131
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by theimage13 View Post
    What the fuck are you talking about?

    First off all, that "new pair of shoes" bullshit is incredibly sexist. Fuck that.

    Second of all, let me be perfectly clear about this: if a drunk woman came up to me and grabbed my ass or my dick or tried to make a move on me, my reactions would be one of the below, in no particular order:
    1) Try to find a friend of hers who appears sober and get the woman some help sobering up,
    2) Brush it off entirely and ignore it (while still being pissed off about it), or
    3) Tell her in no uncertain terms to fuck off because I'm not interested in some drunk woman sexually harassing me (note, I would have to already be in a really, really bad mood and probably actually know the woman - it's not in my nature to get angry with strangers)

    Let me be perfectly clear about what my reaction would NOT be:
    1) This is great!
    2) This is pretty good.
    3) This is remotely acceptable behavior that I am not completely upset about.

    Let's stop portraying sexual harassment as something that's GOOD if a woman does it to a man. That's the dumbest shit I've ever heard. And let's stop the idiotic "women love shoes" sexist bullshit stereotypes while we're at it. They're not helping anybody.
    The analogy is just as sexist as people generalizing and talking about men in general based on a certain group of douchebags abusing women. I find it amusing how certain stereotypes are a complete taboo and get people up in arms, but other stereotypes can be brushed off like ďmeh, whatever, no big dealĒ. I guess it depends on what fits a certain narrative and what doesnít.

    Itís interesting that you didnít mention ďgoing to social media and ranting about it using the trendy hashtag that everyone is usingĒ or ďmaking a big deal about itĒ. And that is my point: as uncomfortable as it might be, for a man in general is not a big deal Ėunless of course it goes too farĖ because sexuality is not approached in the same way by men and women.

    What we have here is a switch of standards, from one that allowed men to get away with reprehensible behaviour to another that sets the female perspective as the new set of rules.

  12. #132
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Louie_Cypher View Post
    went back and forth to respond they do it to are bad foundations for discussion i don't dismiss it immediately like i do name calling here's things in life a re very rarely 1:1 to many variables on each side, at this point in history most things have been done, so I can justify any kind of behavior, no matter how foul, by saying but so and so did it. do women commit acts of sexual misconduct of course they do. does that excuse men. no. 90% percent of serial killers are white males. does that make serial killing OK?no.
    it goes a lot deeper than that, to lengthy to get into on an internet forum. but how we reward or punish people in our modern society. so when we see people behaving badly it's usually deeper than the action when we see rich people arrested for drunk driving, we go why didn't the get a cab or Uber. so when some like Matt gets busted who made 48 million a year not even in my comprehension, last time i checked that kind of cash could probably get you a pretty high end pro. who would act or do anything you wanted. when we see an pandemic of bad behavior, we have to look at causes and solutions, and building constructive dialogue, and before you call me a cuck lefty, snowflake bastard, it starts, at home teaching you sons the correct way to treat to treat woman with respect and equality. and yes that starts with you Mr. president, using the term pussy as term for woman is a derogatory slur and you should be called out on it, you are a bad example for your children and our country. OK I'm done for now. As per a discussion last night with someone who has kids of both genders. asked. So I guess we can't have hero's anymore? to which I explained yes, but also explain in non religious terms that all humans are flawed. why that behavior is wrong, what the right behavior would be. again sorry for being long winded.
    -Louie
    You must have misunderstood my post.

    By no means Iím justifying that shitty behaviour by saying ďeverybody does itĒ. Thatís just plain stupid.

  13. #133
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    670
    Mentioned
    29 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tremolo View Post
    The analogy is just as sexist as people generalizing and talking about men in general based on a certain group of douchebags abusing women. I find it amusing how certain stereotypes are a complete taboo and get people up in arms, but other stereotypes can be brushed off like “meh, whatever, no big deal”. I guess it depends on what fits a certain narrative and what doesn’t.

    It’s interesting that you didn’t mention “going to social media and ranting about it using the trendy hashtag that everyone is using” or “making a big deal about it”. And that is my point: as uncomfortable as it might be, for a man in general is not a big deal –unless of course it goes too far– because sexuality is not approached in the same way by men and women.

    What we have here is a switch of standards, from one that allowed men to get away with reprehensible behaviour to another that sets the female perspective as the new set of rules.
    This might be a step towards more equal rights for women in society. So men must control their behavior, because it can cause harm. However, what about women helping men by wearing clothing that doesn't draw men's eyes to the parts of women's bodies that women don't like random men looking at. It's sometimes almost an automatic reaction to look at cleavage. I have to catch myself after I do it and look away. It's so awkward.
    Last edited by cashpiles; 12-03-2017 at 02:01 PM.

  14. #134
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,505
    Mentioned
    61 Post(s)
    Dude, no one gives a shit if you look at cleavage and catch yourself and look away. It's only awkward if you make it awkward. Nobody needs to "help" anyone be less creepy.

  15. #135
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Laughingstock of the World (America)
    Posts
    2,308
    Mentioned
    52 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cashpiles View Post
    This might be a step towards more equal rights for women in society. So men must control their behavior, because it can cause harm. However, what about women helping men by wearing clothing that doesn't draw men's eyes to the parts of women's bodies that women don't like random men looking.

    THAT'S CALLED VICTIM BLAMING


    Sorry, that needed to be yelled because it's a huge fucking problem. If you can't stop looking at a woman's tits, that is not her fault and not her problem. Control yourself or lock yourself at home. It has not, is not, and will NEVER be a woman's fault that YOU couldn't stop looking or keep your hands off of her. Period. End of story.

  16. #136
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    670
    Mentioned
    29 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by theimage13 View Post

    THAT'S CALLED VICTIM BLAMING


    Sorry, that needed to be yelled because it's a huge fucking problem. If you can't stop looking at a woman's tits, that is not her fault and not her problem. Control yourself or lock yourself at home. It has not, is not, and will NEVER be a woman's fault that YOU couldn't stop looking or keep your hands off of her. Period. End of story.
    So how about I walk around with part of my dick visible? And then I’ll get TONS of UNWANTED looks. It’s such a double standard.

  17. #137
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,596
    Mentioned
    199 Post(s)
    Dick and tits are not equal.

  18. #138
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    9,370
    Mentioned
    734 Post(s)
    Nope. Female breasts are biologically there for one reason: to feed babies. They're not biologically intended to be sexual. Our culture made them sexual.

    And, dressing provocatively is not and has never been an invitation to be assaulted or even ogled, particularly in the workplace. Stop blaming women for your stupidity and caveman primitivity.

    Many of these guys accused of sexual misconduct WHIPPED OUT THEIR RESPECTIVE DICKS IN THE OFFICE.

    IN THE OFFICE.

    Like, who DOES that except for powerful evil assholes?

    If somebody did that to me, seriously, I'd run screaming and then I'd cry. A lot.

    It's not sexy, it's not interesting, it's not anything except scary and awful.

    this is not a "female perspective" -- this is a civilized human being perspective.

    Personally, I am LOVING this whole thing because it's making the harassment and abuse a DANGEROUS ACTIVITY. Not an acceptable activity that's covered up.
    Last edited by allegro; 12-03-2017 at 02:23 PM.

  19. #139
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,596
    Mentioned
    199 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tremolo View Post
    The analogy is just as sexist as people generalizing and talking about men in general based on a(n) certain group of douchebags abusing women epidemic of sexual harassment and violence that women face every day.
    This belief that there is a very small percentage of men who have inappropriate boundaries and behavior when it comes to women is a myth.

  20. #140
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cashpiles View Post
    this might be a step towards more equal rights for women in society. So men must control their behavior, because it can cause harm. However, what about women helping men by wearing clothing that doesn't draw men's eyes to the parts of women's bodies that women don't like random men looking at. It's sometimes almost an automatic reaction to look at cleavage. I have to catch myself after i do it and look away. It's so awkward.
    i have the right to show as much of my body as i want, but donít you dare look at me or iíll get offended, you degenerate pig!

  21. #141
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cashpiles View Post
    So how about I walk around with part of my dick visible? And then Iíll get TONS of UNWANTED looks. Itís such a double standard.
    Youíre a man, therefore the same rules donít apply to you.

    If you show up wearing no underwear and thin white pants that outline every vein on your dick, everyone will be up in arms and ready to complain for your offensive degenerate behaviour.

  22. #142
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sarah K View Post
    This belief that there is a very small percentage of men who have inappropriate boundaries and behavior when it comes to women is a myth.
    Of course it is a myth, if that fits your narrative.

  23. #143
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by allegro View Post
    Nope. Female breasts are biologically there for one reason: to feed babies. They're not biologically intended to be sexual. Our culture made them sexual.

    And, dressing provocatively is not and has never been an invitation to be assaulted or even ogled, particularly in the workplace. Stop blaming women for your stupidity and caveman primitivity.

    Many of these guys accused of sexual misconduct WHIPPED OUT THEIR RESPECTIVE DICKS IN THE OFFICE.

    IN THE OFFICE.

    Like, who DOES that except for powerful evil assholes?

    If somebody did that to me, seriously, I'd run screaming and then I'd cry. A lot.

    It's not sexy, it's not interesting, it's not anything except scary and awful.

    this is not a "female perspective" -- this is a civilized human being perspective.

    Personally, I am LOVING this whole thing because it's making the harassment and abuse a DANGEROUS ACTIVITY. Not an acceptable activity that's covered up.
    And this is how ONE post by a random anonymous user of the internet debunks decades of studies and research in psychology and sexuality.

    Reality is our behaviour is not strictly biological.

    Under your limited perspective, mouths are there for feeding, speaking and breathing, not for sucking dicks, eating pussy or even kissing. Same thing could be said for the anus: it is there for shitting, not for taking dicks or any objects.

    Now you know, gay people, you got it all wrong.

  24. #144
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sarah K View Post
    Dick and tits are not equal.
    Just like men and women.

  25. #145
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Laughingstock of the World (America)
    Posts
    2,308
    Mentioned
    52 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tremolo View Post
    i have the right to show as much of my body as i want, but donít you dare look at me or iíll get offended, you degenerate pig!
    Look: the vast majority of people on this planet are sexually attracted to other people. Looking is natural.

    Here's the problem.

    The DOJ's low estimate for the number of women raped each year is 300,000. Three. Hundred. Thousand. The high estimate is 1.3 million.

    Women have every reason in the world to wonder what a "look" could turn into.

  26. #146
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by theimage13 View Post
    Look: the vast majority of people on this planet are sexually attracted to other people. Looking is natural.

    Here's the problem.

    The DOJ's low estimate for the number of women raped each year is 300,000. Three. Hundred. Thousand. The high estimate is 1.3 million.

    Women have every reason in the world to wonder what a "look" could turn into.
    I know what you mean, but some of those overreactions seem pretty ridiculous to me. We coud state the same about murder victims, but I donít think anyone would truly benefit from a constant state of paranoia.

    There has to be a minimum of common sense from all parties involved. Sexual harrasment, sexual misconduct, rape, etc, are reprehensible behaviours, and society seems to be gearing towards less and less tolerance towards those who do that shit, and there are laws already in place to punish those acts. However, thereís a long way to go to get to the point where people will genuinely respect one another, so, while that happens, while we get there, everyone would benefit from a bit of common sense.

    I think I have the right and should have the freedom to walk around the sketchiest neighbourhoods wearing a suit made of $100 bills without having to be worried about my safety. But thatís not the reality we live in today. And while I believeas a society we should head towards that goal, common sense tells me maybe I should choose a better time and place to wear my suit. That does not mean I cater to the bad guys, it only means I understand that weíre not quite there yet, and that my own safety and well-being are more important than being stubborn, making a point, or any cause I might believe in.

    Some people will say thatís victim-blaming. I disagree. I truly believe that all of us should be free to wear whatever we want without it being a reason for judgement, but until we get there, a bit of common sense should be mandatory: being aware of the situation right here right now.

  27. #147
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    998
    Mentioned
    58 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tremolo View Post
    I think I have the right and should have the freedom to walk around the sketchiest neighbourhoods wearing a suit made of $100 bills without having to be worried about my safety. But thatís not the reality we live in today.
    Yeah but this is an obnoxious comparison to make in a thread about sexual assault. The victims in all these cases were not doing anything remotely comparable to "walking around the sketchiest neighborhoods wearing a suit made of $100 bills." They were simply existing.

  28. #148
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    186
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mantra View Post
    Yeah but this is an obnoxious comparison to make in a thread about sexual assault. The victims in all these cases were not doing anything remotely comparable to "walking around the sketchiest neighborhoods wearing a suit made of $100 bills." They were simply existing.
    It was all referred to a post above that had to do with cleavage and men looking.

  29. #149
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    998
    Mentioned
    58 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tremolo View Post
    It was all referred to a post above that had to do with cleavage and men looking.
    Yes I know.

    And the whole reason "cleavage and men looking" was being discussed in the first place was because Cashpiles said: "men must control their behavior, because it can cause harm. However, what about women helping men by wearing clothing that doesn't draw men's eyes to the parts of women's bodies that women don't like random men looking at."

    This was a ludicrous statement with no relevance to a thread about sexual assault. Nor did the ensuing conversation that it inspired have any relevance to the thread topic. The only reason someone would bring this up in a thread about sexual assault would be to suggest that women's clothing has something to do with men "controlling their behavior" (i.e: not raping). Which it clearly doesn't.

  30. #150
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,505
    Mentioned
    61 Post(s)
    I remember when I used to work retail, when I'd work an opening shift I'd need to leave my house around 3ish to take the bus/train into the city to get to work on time. I lived in a pretty safe neighborhood (northern 104th precinct: https://maps.nyc.gov/crime/) and I had a few especially not-great experiences of street harassment (being yelled at or asked super inappropriate questions or having my personal space invaded vs. merely catcalling) as I walked to the bus or train alone, or within the subway system (something I now have the means to opt the fuck out of at that hour and would, because street harassment sucks) -- and I remember, if I wore a green hoodie I owned instead of my myriad of black ones, the amount of catcalling, etc, I'd receive would notably tick up. A fucking. Green. Hoodie.

    That I've never received a lot of street harassment compared to my peers. Everryyynow and then it happens. It lessened even more when I got a little fat and cut my hair, which, added bonus. That said, I was sort of assaulted last year when I was kinda grabbed by a guy while I was on the phone with someone (I was actually conducting an interview, and just kept going) -- it was a confusing, blurry experience. I think I was wearing a big baggy army jacket.

    cashpiles observation was bad. It's a stupid thing to give any credence to beyond "no, not a thing." Yes, a woman SHOULD be able to walk through a bad neighborhood in a bikini (though really, how many rapists work on Wall Street and are named Chet, so kinda fuck that implication as far as classism goes) but I remember how wearing A COLOR would up my harassment because people are absolute garbage.
    Last edited by playwithfire; 12-03-2017 at 06:24 PM.

Posting Permissions