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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #841
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mantra View Post
    And actually, the 90s Sense and Sensibility is the only Austen adaptation I've ever seen, so no, I haven't seen that Pride and Prejudice adaptation yet, but I hear it's good. That said, is that scene in the book at all? I swear I don't remember anything like that. Not saying it doesn't look like a good movie, I'm just trying to figure out if it's completely added or if my memory is just totally shot. I re-read all of Austen's stuff almost two years ago, so I feel like it's pretty fresh in my memory. Have you seen the Kiera Knightly one? If so, do you have a preference between the two?
    No, the swimming in the pond scene isn’t in the book (an example of my saying that it occasionally strays from the book, although not too much); in the book, Darcy does suddenly appear at Pemberley while Elizabeth is touring it with her Aunt and Uncle, but not half-dressed and hunky like Colin Firth hubba-hubba lol. In Austen’s day, Darcy probably had a powdered wig bleh. Anyway, I’ve seen *several* film adaptations of P&P and the BBC Colin Firth one is my favorite, I HIGHLY recommend it.

    Scholars are fairly certain that Austen’s Pemberley is really Chatsworth:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=jertOy3zxqA

    It was featured in film versions of P&P which is really cool:

    https://www.visitbritainshop.com/wor...and-prejudice/

    Note too that in the film adaptation of Helen Fielding’s “Bridget Jones’s Diary,” Mark Darcy is played by ... COLIN FIRTH!!

    Because, of course, Mark Darcy IS Mr. Darcy!!

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=oZu2JfM2Aq8

    The Kiera Knightly one is TERRIBLE, GAH! But, if I see it’s on I’ll watch it anyway because even bad Austen is better than no Austen.
    Last edited by allegro; 11-15-2017 at 01:36 AM.

  2. #842
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    lol, the funny thing is that, as tame as it is, I thought to myself, wow, this scene strikes me as a bit more openly sexual/erotic than you typically encounter in austen, which is why i was sure i'd have remembered it if it was in the book. i'm guessing the producers thought it would help to spice the movie up just a tiny bit. lol.

    i kind of like the way sexuality is so submerged in her books, and yet you still sense that it's there in all the characters without it ever being stated openly. there'll be some scene where they're just walking together, but she writes it like it's the most ecstatic thing ever. or i remember a part in, i think northanger abbey(?), where the dude helps her into the carriage and she gets all flustered and it says something like "he had placed her there WITH HIS VERY HANDS." it's not only that i find that stuff kind of funny and charming, but also i can't help admiring the talent it requires as a writer. it's the most successful and impressive demonstration of a person indirectly writing about sexuality that i can think of. it's probably a contributing factor into why she was so popular.

  3. #843
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    She was really FUNNY, too! A great sarcastic wit.

  4. #844
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    Quote Originally Posted by allegro View Post
    She was really FUNNY, too! A great sarcastic wit.
    Yes, absolutely. I always try to stress this to people who are hesitant about getting into her, people who have a vague impression of Austen being some stuffy, boring oldtimey writer. I always emphasize how fun and comedic her books can be.

    btw, did you hear about this shit? http://www.chronicle.com/article/Alt...-Austen/239435

    first time i saw that i was so fucking irritated, lol. those assholes try to ruin everything.

  5. #845
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mantra View Post
    Yes, absolutely. I always try to stress this to people who are hesitant about getting into her, people who have a vague impression of Austen being some stuffy, boring oldtimey writer. I always emphasize how fun and comedic her books can be.

    btw, did you hear about this shit? http://www.chronicle.com/article/Alt...-Austen/239435

    first time i saw that i was so fucking irritated, lol. those assholes try to ruin everything.
    What the hell?? That whole article is irritating to me, even the English Prof’s approach to it. She knows full well that most colleges don’t have a Regency period specialization so they group those authors and poets from Regency as “pre Victorian” for lack of a better way to offer them in academia but also because Victorian was INFORMED by Regency and Romanticism. She’s nitpicking, and so am I. Not that Idiot Yiannopoulos knows any of this. Anyway, this idea that Austen was a staunch feminist amuses me; I did a lengthy research essay in college viewing Elizabeth in P&P from the feminist perspective and the academic research was about 50/50.(Full disclosure: I actually enjoy reading academic criticism of Austen more than reading Austen.) Elizabeth knew she needed a husband to survive and she held out for the BEST ONE; Darcy is RICH and POWERFUL with a giant MANSION. But her heroines do express the desire for the same education and esteem that men possess, so there is that aspect of "feminism" (which of course didn't exist at the time, but the very fact that Austen was an AUTHOR yet she had to hide in her room so nobody would come rip up her novels shows what she was up against; it wasn't about hot or not). Austen wrote about the realities of that era. Mary Wollstonecraft was a total babe, arguing against smarmy romantic heroism. Then her daughter, Mary, married that romantic poet SHELLEY ... comparing the works of the two Marys to Austen is an interesting study.

    Edit: Ugh I hereby resolve that I will never again attempt to read or compose anything of substance via my iPhone 7+. STILL TOO SMALL for this purpose.
    Last edited by allegro; 11-15-2017 at 01:16 PM.

  6. #846
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    Okay, what I am reading:

    Theresa Caputo's (Long Island Medium): "Good Grief: Heal Your Soul, Honor Your Loved Ones, and Learn to Live Again"

    I'm totally serious.

    Heh heh

  7. #847
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    Quote Originally Posted by allegro View Post
    What the hell?? That whole article is irritating to me, even the English Prof’s approach to it. She knows full well that most colleges don’t have a Regency period specialization so they group those authors and poets from Regency as “pre Victorian” for lack of a better way to offer them in academia but also because Victorian was INFORMED by Regency and Romanticism. She’s nitpicking, and so am I. Not that Idiot Yiannopoulos knows any of this. Anyway, this idea that Austen was a staunch feminist amuses me; I did a lengthy research essay in college viewing Elizabeth in P&P from the feminist perspective and the academic research was about 50/50.(Full disclosure: I actually enjoy reading academic criticism of Austen more than reading Austen.) Elizabeth knew she needed a husband to survive and she held out for the BEST ONE; Darcy is RICH and POWERFUL with a giant MANSION. But her heroines do express the desire for the same education and esteem that men possess, so there is that aspect of "feminism" (which of course didn't exist at the time, but the very fact that Austen was an AUTHOR yet she had to hide in her room so nobody would come rip up her novels shows what she was up against; it wasn't about hot or not). Austen wrote about the realities of that era. Mary Wollstonecraft was a total babe, arguing against smarmy romantic heroism. Then her daughter, Mary, married that romantic poet SHELLEY ... comparing the works of the two Marys to Austen is an interesting study.

    Edit: Ugh I hereby resolve that I will never again attempt to read or compose anything of substance via my iPhone 7+. STILL TOO SMALL for this purpose.
    True, I don't think you can call Austen a straight-up feminist. That strikes me as a little anachronistic. I suppose Vindication of the Rights of Women was already out by the time Austen was writing, but I'm not aware of her interacting with those ideas, and it doesn't seem to appear in her work. And anyway, even though Wollstonecraft is incredibly awesome, she's more like proto-feminism, simply because feminism as an organized movement and philosophy was not really up and running at that point.

    But still, it's totally insane for alt-right dudes to try and claim Austen. Her work is not about celebrating patriarchal social structures, or idealizing antiquated notions of feminine purity/submission, or anything else these fucking idiots love to fantasize about. The conflict of her stories often boils down to "individuals vs. their society," so it makes no fucking sense to view the depictions of early 1800s England in a nostalgic or positive light. Austen's all about showing how the lives of both men and women are constrained by social conventions, how personal happiness is at odds with the cultural demands and expectations of society. It's not some virtuous Edenic vision for the world. She shows the how women try to navigate within their depressing limitations. Her characters make do with the conditions they were born in to because it's all they have, and so they do what they can to carve out some happiness for themselves whenever possible. Women's dependence upon men is written about because that was the reality of the time period, not because Austen was trying to show how wonderful it is to live under a gendered hierarchy.

  8. #848
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mantra View Post
    True, I don't think you can call Austen a straight-up feminist. That strikes me as a little anachronistic. I suppose Vindication of the Rights of Women was already out by the time Austen was writing, but I'm not aware of her interacting with those ideas, and it doesn't seem to appear in her work. And anyway, even though Wollstonecraft is incredibly awesome, she's more like proto-feminism, simply because feminism as an organized movement and philosophy was not really up and running at that point.

    But still, it's totally insane for alt-right dudes to try and claim Austen. Her work is not about celebrating patriarchal social structures, or idealizing antiquated notions of feminine purity/submission, or anything else these fucking idiots love to fantasize about. The conflict of her stories often boils down to "individuals vs. their society," so it makes no fucking sense to view the depictions of early 1800s England in a nostalgic or positive light. Austen's all about showing how the lives of both men and women are constrained by social conventions, how personal happiness is at odds with the cultural demands and expectations of society. It's not some virtuous Edenic vision for the world. She shows the how women try to navigate within their depressing limitations. Her characters make do with the conditions they were born in to because it's all they have, and so they do what they can to carve out some happiness for themselves whenever possible. Women's dependence upon men is written about because that was the reality of the time period, not because Austen was trying to show how wonderful it is to live under a gendered hierarchy.
    YES, EXACTLY!!! Bravo!!!

  9. #849
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    Quote Originally Posted by allegro View Post
    Okay, what I am reading:

    Theresa Caputo's (Long Island Medium): "Good Grief: Heal Your Soul, Honor Your Loved Ones, and Learn to Live Again"

    I'm totally serious.

    Heh heh
    Hah...How is it?

  10. #850
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mantra View Post
    Hah...How is it?
    So far, it’s actually helping me feel better. I like it.

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    I just finished All the Ugly and Wonderful Things and I am just not sure how I feel about that AT ALL.

    I am also about 35% through I Know This Much is True. Which I really like, it is just so looooong, so I took a break and read the above book.

  12. #852
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarah K View Post
    I just finished All the Ugly and Wonderful Things and I am just not sure how I feel about that AT ALL.
    Ohh, I've read about this book and I thought it sounded really...odd. I'm an open minded person who can roll with books and movies about things that are uncomfortable or unconventional or taboo, but still, this just sounded really, really questionable. But of course, I haven't read it.

    Is it really as bad as it sounds? What did you think about it?

  13. #853
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    I mean, I am glad that I read it, and I think that it will stick with me for a very long time.

    I think that when it comes to this topic, people have such an uninformed, emotional reaction that it is hard for them to read anything about it without getting angry and upset.

    It's a good book. But it is definitely going to be challenging for some folks.

  14. #854
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    Just finished 32 Fangs to finish up David Wellingtons Vampire series. I've probably said this before but he does a good job in the Genre. Picked up Post Office at the same time but i have to limit my Bukowski intake to small doses. Today grabbed Skinny Dip by Hiaasen, the guy writes the most absurdly funny shit.

  15. #855
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pillfred View Post
    Picked up Post Office at the same time but i have to limit my Bukowski intake to small doses.
    Same here, Bukowski has always struck me as a little one-note. That said, Post Office is my favorite thing of his, hands down.

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    I’m Fine....and Other Lies by Whitney Cummings

    She’s so much more articulate and relatable than I would have thought given that she is the co-creator of 2 Broke Girls (jokes that make me cringe). I have an addiction to memoirs.

  17. #857
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    I'm reading A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again and currently I'm at the "E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction" essay. Wow, this thing. I'm pretty sure DFW would hate twitter.

  18. #858
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mantra View Post
    Same here, Bukowski has always struck me as a little one-note. That said, Post Office is my favorite thing of his, hands down.
    First novel of his I picked up. I've read compilations, poems, etc. I find myself usually more interested in the outlying writings of older writers such as him, loosely speaking. I like to pick out the person more so than the more mainstream works.

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